Sunday, October 22, 2006

Biotech News - The Girl Scouts Honor TGen’s Guerra - ‘World of the Future’ award

The Girl Scouts Honor TGen's Guerra - `World of the Future' award

The Girl Scouts Honor TGen's Guerra


Guerra recipient of the `World of the Future' award

10-20-2006

Phoenix, AZ, October 20, 2006--Ms. MaryAnn Guerra, Chief Operating Officer of the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), is being honored by the Girl Scouts - Arizona Cactus-Pine Council as a 2006 Woman of Distinction.
The Girl Scouts – Arizona Cactus-Pine Council annually recognizes Arizona women who are role models for girls by living by the Girl Scout Promise and Girl Scout Law. Awards in six categories reflect facets of their lives that positively impact girls of today and tomorrow. Chosen for their exceptional community service and leadership, these women and girls are pinnacles in their professions and in their communities as they represent the highest ideals in Girl Scouting.

Ms. Guerra will receive the World of the Future Award, given to women who are committed to the advancement of the rapidly changing worlds of business, math, science and technology.

"I truly believe that Girl Scouting, especially in today's world, provides extraordinary opportunities for young women," said Ms. Guerra. "Being a Girl Scout allowed me to try new activities and learn things I wouldn't have thought of and to earn recognition for my achievements. Girl Scouting allows you to excel in areas of strength both as an individual and as a team player. These values are fundamental building blocks that allow young women to leverage their talents and achieve their goals."

Ms. Guerra was nominated for the award because of her many contributions to the Arizona community through her work at TGen.

"MaryAnn demonstrates daily what it means to be a Girl Scout," said Denise D. Resnik, president of Denise Resnik & Associates and co-founder/board chairman of the Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center, who nominated Ms. Guerra for the award. "She is a visionary leader and boldly spearheads the most ambitious endeavors as well as rolls up her sleeves to be an active team member, a supportive mentor and a trusted friend. She approaches her work with great tenacity, urgency and dedication, and is pivotal in advancing scientific discoveries and medicine that will some day impact us all."

Ms. Guerra will accept the award at a ceremony on December 9th at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort and Spa. Visit www.girlscoutsaz.org for event details. Tickets are $60 each.


# # #

About TGen
The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization, is focused on developing earlier diagnostics and smarter treatments. Translational genomics research is a relatively new field employing innovative advances arising from the Human Genome Project and applying them to the development of diagnostics, prognostics and therapies for cancer, neurological disorders, diabetes and other complex diseases. TGen's research is based on personalized medicine and the institute plans to accomplish its goals through robust and disease-focused research.

About Arizona Cactus-Pine Council
Arizona Cactus-Pine Council offers more than traditional Girl Scouting – it shapes the future of Arizona with innovative and locally-focused programs. Outreach programs – for female offenders and their daughters through Girl Scouts Beyond Bars, Baby Camp for teen moms and their babies, We Believe in Girls for girls in economically-challenged or high-risk neighborhoods and homeless shelters, and First Saturdays for at-risk girls living in economically depressed neighborhoods, and our newest program STUDIO 2B, A Girl Scout program girls can relate to; a program For girls – By girls. Are just a sampling of how we provide programs to girls in Arizona, far beyond the traditional cookies and camping of yesteryear. Our goal is to bring Girl Scout programs to Every Girl, Everywhere.

About Girl Scouts
The purpose of Girl Scouting is to inspire girls with the highest ideals of character, conduct, patriotism, and service that they may become happy and resourceful citizens. Girl Scouts is the preeminent organization for girls with more than 3.8 million girl and adult members.
 
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Thursday, October 19, 2006

Phoenix Biomedical Campus

Phoenix Biomedical Campus opens in Downtown Phoenix



Historic Phoenix Union High School
Re-Opens as State-of-the-Art Biomedical Campus



A 2005 study by Tripp Umbach Healthcare Consulting indicated that the Phoenix Biomedical Campus has the potential to generate billions annually for Arizona within the next 20 years.



The city of Phoenix in collaboration with the University of Arizona College of Medicine, the state of Arizona and Arizona State University today opened the new Phoenix Biomedical Campus.


"This is the largest public historic rehabilitation project to be undertaken within the city of Phoenix and will provide economic benefits not only to Phoenix, but the entire state of Arizona in terms of overall economic impact and added jobs," said Mayor Phil Gordon. "The three historic Phoenix Union High School buildings are beautiful beyond words, and so beautifully define the new U of A College of Medicine in downtown Phoenix."


The $27 million rehabilitation project includes three historic buildings that house a variety of UA College of Medicine academic and administrative functions. In 2001, the city of Phoenix established the 28-acre urban biomedical campus as one of several downtown revitalization projects. The campus includes the headquarters of the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGEN), International Genomics Consortium (IGC), National Institute Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), St. Joseph's Hospital and Barrow Neurological Institute, the Phoenix operations of the University of Arizona College of Medicine and the Arizona Biomedical Collaborative.


The historic campus - including two 1911 classroom buildings and a 1929 auditorium - was rehabilitated and returned to its historic character through a reuse project proposed by the University of Arizona Medical School.


The project restored key interior features and exterior facades, and restored historic site features such as the flagpole, the World War I memorial sundial and auditorium clock. The project also re-introduced a modern landscape that is reminiscent of the historic landscape, complete with a horseshoe pedestrian drive flanking the auditorium. A new addition, housing a restroom and elevator core, is located on the rear of the two classroom buildings.


Phoenix Union High School was the first established high school in Phoenix and was the only high school in the city from 1898 to 1939. Located in a prime residential area, adjacent to two major city streets (Van Buren and Seventh streets), the high school served as the center of Phoenix cultural, civic and family life during the first half of the 20th century and remains a prominent feature of the downtown area.


The historic school campus is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a Phoenix historic landmark. The historic school campus is owned by the city of Phoenix, with the Arizona Board of Regents leasing the property for the medical school use and taking responsibility for the rehabilitation project.


According to a recent Tripp Umbach study, the Phoenix Biomedical Campus is anticipated to generate $77.1 million in overall economic impact with TGEN, ASU and UA programs in operation. By 2025, the Phoenix Biomedical Campus is expected to rank among Arizona's leading economic engines, generating $1.1 to $2.1 billion in annual economic impact for the state of Arizona.


Fact Sheet


The Phoenix Union High School Historic District was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1982 and in the Phoenix Historic Property Register in 1986. In 2002, the City Council upgraded the designation to Historic Landmark status. The three surviving buildings (from east to west, the Science Building, Auditorium and Domestic Arts and Sciences building) on the PUHS campus are outstanding examples of the Neoclassical Revival Style with a Beaux Arts influence.
Residents of Phoenix voted to establish the Phoenix High School in 1895. The high school used a room in the old Central School Building at 200 N. Central Ave. where Hotel San Carlos is now located. There were 90 students in the class of 1895-96.


1898, students began attending classes in the home built for Territorial Secretary of State Clark Churchill. The "… new high school took advantage of the existing Churchill residence and the [Churchill Addition] subdivision's potential for residential growth as well as the access provided by E. Van Buren Street on of the city's main traffic arteries."1 "The property, … purchased by the Board for $15,000, was the cornerstone for what would become one of the largest and most highly regarded schools west of the Mississippi River."2 An annex was added in 1899, for an additional $15,000, but the student population quickly outgrew that as well.
1911, the three remaining buildings, designed by architect Norman Marsh, were constructed based on a new "campus plan" concept where students attended classes in different buildings depending upon the nature of the course.


1929, a portion of the auditorium was demolished so that it could be enlarged to accommodate the growing population of the school and the city. Only the southernmost portion of the building remained standing, but it collapsed in a windstorm. The auditorium was reconstructed, using the original cornerstone, and was used for school and community activities.


The Victorian-era Churchill Home with Second Empire features was demolished in 1949 to make way for a cafeteria and a new wing for the Domestic Arts Building (Building One). In later years, Van Buren Street was widened, and the windows on three buildings were bricked up and substantially reduced in size.
Classes at Phoenix Union High School ended in 1984 and the buildings were used for office space, theater space and eventually sat vacant for some time. In 2003, with the three buildings facing demolition, the city of Phoenix purchased the site from the developer and began formulating plans for the biomedical research park.
The rehabilitation project undertaken to prepare the site for use as the University of Arizona College of Medicine Phoenix campus was extensive. The brick panels that had reduced the window openings were removed and new true divided light wood windows were installed in all three buildings to match the historic windows. Several damaged plaster capitals on the Domestic Arts and Sciences building were repaired or replaced. The west entrance on the Science building was rebuilt and the coffered plaster ceilings in the auditorium were repaired. Another important element of the rehabilitation was the restoration of the landscaping, including the horseshoe drive that encircled the auditorium and the re-installation of the World War I memorial honoring Frank Luke. City of Phoenix Historic Preservation Bond funds were utilized to purchase the buildings ($3 million from the 2001 Bond) and for the rehabilitation (approximately $1.2 million from the 2006 Bond).
The 85,000-square-foot, four-story building is the first building shared by the University of Arizona and Arizona State University.


The Phoenix Biomedical Campus is anticipated to generate $77.1 million in overall economic impact with TGEN, the ASU Bioinformatics Program and the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix program.


By 2025, the Phoenix Biomedical Campus could rank among Arizona's leading economic engines, generating $1.1 to $21 billion in annual economic impact for the state of Arizona.


Employing different scenarios and assumptions, it is projected that the Phoenix Biomedical Campus at build-out could provide stable employment for 14,000 to 24,000 Arizonans.


By 2025 the campus has the potential to generate $460 to 110.2 million annually in government revenue, providing the state of Arizona $2 to $4 in annual government revenue for every $1 invested.


1 "Phoenix Union High School Historic District National Register of Historic Places Inventory - Nomination Form." Janus Associates, Inc. April 1982. 7-2.


2 Duchemin, Michael. "Look to 'the Source:' PUHS Laid Education Cornerstone for Early Phoenix. Arizona History Magazine. Tucson: Arizona Historical Society, 4(5), Sept/Oct 1987, 5.

Biotech News

Biotech News - Phoenix Biomedical Campus Captures Economic Award


Phoenix Biomedical Campus Captures Economic Award



Arizona Biotech
Biotech News
AZhttp, Inc.
Arizona Entrepreneurs


The Phoenix Biomedical Campus received an “Economic Engines of Arizona Award” by Arizona Business Magazine on Wednesday, Oct. 4.

The award honors the top people, places, products and services that have made significant contributions to Arizona’s economy. The Phoenix Biomedical Campus was chosen to receive one of the Economic Engines of Arizona Awards in the “Places” category. In total, 20 awards were presented to the very best of Arizona’s driving economic engines. The Phoenix Biomedical Campus was recognized as an economic development project that demonstrates local, regional and statewide collaboration.

In 2001, the city of Phoenix established the 28-acre urban biomedical campus as one of several downtown revitalization projects. The campus includes the headquarters of the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGEN), International Genomics Consortium (IGC), National Institute Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), St. JosephÂ’s Hospital and Barrow Neurological Institute, the Phoenix operations of the University of Arizona College of Medicine and the Arizona Biomedical Collaborative.

The campus is planned to accommodate up to two million square feet of biomedical research, academic and clinical facilities. The campus has attracted adjacent private sector investment, which includes Ribomed Technologies and the Phoenix Biotechnology Accelerator.

===============

Historic Phoenix Union High School Re-Opens as State-of-the-Art
Biomedical Campus

The city of Phoenix in collaboration with the University of Arizona
College of Medicine, the state of Arizona and Arizona State
University today opened the new Phoenix Biomedical Campus.

"This is the largest public historic rehabilitation project to be
undertaken within the city of Phoenix and will provide economic
benefits not only to Phoenix, but the entire state of Arizona in
terms of overall economic impact and added jobs," said Mayor Phil
Gordon. "The three historic Phoenix Union High School buildings are
beautiful beyond words, and so beautifully define the new U of A
College of Medicine in downtown Phoenix."

The $27 million rehabilitation project includes three historic
buildings that house a variety of UA College of Medicine academic
and administrative functions. In 2001, the city of Phoenix
established the 28-acre urban biomedical campus as one of several
downtown revitalization projects. The campus includes the
headquarters of the Translational Genomics Research Institute
(TGEN), International Genomics Consortium (IGC), National Institute
Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), St. Joseph's
Hospital and Barrow Neurological Institute, the Phoenix operations
of the University of Arizona College of Medicine and the Arizona
Biomedical Collaborative.

The historic campus – including two 1911 classroom buildings and a
1929 auditorium - was rehabilitated and returned to its historic
character through a reuse project proposed by the University of
Arizona Medical School.

The project restored key interior features and exterior facades, and
restored historic site features such as the flagpole, the World War
I memorial sundial and auditorium clock. The project also re-
introduced a modern landscape that is reminiscent of the historic
landscape, complete with a horseshoe pedestrian drive flanking the
auditorium. A new addition, housing a restroom and elevator core, is
located on the rear of the two classroom buildings.

Phoenix Union High School was the first established high school in
Phoenix and was the only high school in the city from 1898 to 1939.
Located in a prime residential area, adjacent to two major city
streets (Van Buren and Seventh streets), the high school served as
the center of Phoenix cultural, civic and family life during the
first half of the 20th century and remains a prominent feature of
the downtown area.

The historic school campus is listed on the National Register of
Historic Places and is a Phoenix historic landmark. The historic
school campus is owned by the city of Phoenix, with the Arizona
Board of Regents leasing the property for the medical school use and
taking responsibility for the rehabilitation project.

According to a recent Tripp Umbach study, the Phoenix Biomedical
Campus is anticipated to generate $77.1 million in overall economic
impact with TGEN, ASU and UA programs in operation. By 2025, the
Phoenix Biomedical Campus is expected to rank among Arizona's
leading economic engines, generating $1.1 to $2.1 billion in annual
economic impact for the state of Arizona.

Fact Sheet

The Phoenix Union High School Historic District was listed in the
National Register of Historic Places in 1982 and in the Phoenix
Historic Property Register in 1986. In 2002, the City Council
upgraded the designation to Historic Landmark status. The three
surviving buildings (from east to west, the Science Building,
Auditorium and Domestic Arts and Sciences building) on the PUHS
campus are outstanding examples of the Neoclassical Revival Style
with a Beaux Arts influence.
Residents of Phoenix voted to establish the Phoenix High School in
1895. The high school used a room in the old Central School Building
at 200 N. Central Ave. where Hotel San Carlos is now located. There
were 90 students in the class of 1895-96.
1898, students began attending classes in the home built for
Territorial Secretary of State Clark Churchill. The "Â… new high
school took advantage of the existing Churchill residence and the
[Churchill Addition] subdivision's potential for residential growth
as well as the access provided by E. Van Buren Street on of the
city's main traffic arteries."1 "The property, Â… purchased by the
Board for $15,000, was the cornerstone for what would become one of
the largest and most highly regarded schools west of the Mississippi
River."2 An annex was added in 1899, for an additional $15,000, but
the student population quickly outgrew that as well.
1911, the three remaining buildings, designed by architect Norman
Marsh, were constructed based on a new "campus plan" concept where
students attended classes in different buildings depending upon the
nature of the course.
1929, a portion of the auditorium was demolished so that it could be
enlarged to accommodate the growing population of the school and the
city. Only the southernmost portion of the building remained
standing, but it collapsed in a windstorm. The auditorium was
reconstructed, using the original cornerstone, and was used for
school and community activities.
The Victorian-era Churchill Home with Second Empire features was
demolished in 1949 to make way for a cafeteria and a new wing for
the Domestic Arts Building (Building One). In later years, Van Buren
Street was widened, and the windows on three buildings were bricked
up and substantially reduced in size.
Classes at Phoenix Union High School ended in 1984 and the buildings
were used for office space, theater space and eventually sat vacant
for some time. In 2003, with the three buildings facing demolition,
the city of Phoenix purchased the site from the developer and began
formulating plans for the biomedical research park.
The rehabilitation project undertaken to prepare the site for use as
the University of Arizona College of Medicine Phoenix campus was
extensive. The brick panels that had reduced the window openings
were removed and new true divided light wood windows were installed
in all three buildings to match the historic windows. Several
damaged plaster capitals on the Domestic Arts and Sciences building
were repaired or replaced. The west entrance on the Science building
was rebuilt and the coffered plaster ceilings in the auditorium were
repaired. Another important element of the rehabilitation was the
restoration of the landscaping, including the horseshoe drive that
encircled the auditorium and the re-installation of the World War I
memorial honoring Frank Luke. City of Phoenix Historic Preservation
Bond funds were utilized to purchase the buildings ($3 million from
the 2001 Bond) and for the rehabilitation (approximately $1.2
million from the 2006 Bond).
The 85,000-square-foot, four-story building is the first building
shared by the University of Arizona and Arizona State University.
The Phoenix Biomedical Campus is anticipated to generate $77.1
million in overall economic impact with TGEN, the ASU Bioinformatics
Program and the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix
program.
By 2025, the Phoenix Biomedical Campus could rank among Arizona's
leading economic engines, generating $1.1 to $21 billion in annual
economic impact for the state of Arizona.
Employing different scenarios and assumptions, it is projected that
the Phoenix Biomedical Campus at build-out could provide stable
employment for 14,000 to 24,000 Arizonans.
By 2025 the campus has the potential to generate $460 to 110.2
million annually in government revenue, providing the state of
Arizona $2 to $4 in annual government revenue for every $1 invested.
1 "Phoenix Union High School Historic District National Register of
Historic Places Inventory – Nomination Form." Janus Associates, Inc.
April 1982. 7-2.

2 Duchemin, Michael. "Look to `the Source:' PUHS Laid Education
Cornerstone for Early Phoenix. Arizona History Magazine. Tucson:
Arizona Historical Society, 4(5), Sept/Oct 1987, 5.



Wednesday, October 18, 2006

Biotech News - Zila Completes Strategic Divestiture of Nutraceuticals Division

Zila Completes Strategic Divestiture of Nutraceuticals Division
Company Focuses on Cancer Detection Technologies

PHOENIX, AZ - Oct 03, 2006 -- Zila, Inc. (Nasdaq GM: ZILA) has
completed the divestiture of its wholly-owned subsidiary Zila
Nutraceuticals, Inc. for a total cash transaction of $37.5 million
with up to an additional $3 million to be paid through an earn-out
formula dependent upon the future performance of the business. Zila
Nutraceuticals, manufacturer and marketer of Ester-C(R) and Ester-E
(R), was purchased by NBTY, Inc. (NYSE: NTY). The sale is consistent
with Zila's strategy of focusing its business on cancer detection
technologies and divesting its non-core assets.

"This sale accomplishes several very important objectives for Zila
by completing our exit from the nutraceuticals space on favorable
financial terms and providing capital to fund our future strategic
business objectives and operations," said Zila Chairman, President
and CEO, Douglas D. Burkett, Ph.D.



The Company has used part of the net proceeds from the sale to repay
the remaining outstanding funds owed in connection with the $40
million Black Diamond Credit Facility. With the exception of
approximately $500,000 of capital lease obligations, Zila now has no
debt.

The balance of the proceeds may be used to (i) pursue opportunities
focused on the development and commercialization of cancer detection
products by its Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology Business Units,
including a potential acquisition currently under a non-binding
letter of intent, and (ii) for general corporate purposes.

Alvarez & Marsal Corporate Finance served as exclusive financial
advisor to Zila, Inc. in connection with the sale of Zila
Nutraceuticals, Inc., as well as in the securing of the $40 million
credit facility with Black Diamond Commercial Finance, L.L.C. that
was retired from the proceeds of such sale.

About Zila, Inc.

Zila, Inc., headquartered in Phoenix, is a leading cancer diagnostic
company initially focused on oral cancer:

• Zila Pharmaceuticals is dedicated to establishing ViziLite(R) Plus
as the new standard of care for the early detection of oral
abnormalities that could lead to cancer.
• Zila Biotechnology is focused on achieving regulatory approval for
the next generation oral cancer diagnostic, OraTest(R), followed by
the development of additional applications of its cancer detection
technologies including products for the early detection of cervical
and esophageal cancer.

For more information about Zila, visit www.zila.com.

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the
meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E
of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These forward-looking
statements are based largely on Zila's expectations or forecasts of
future events, can be affected by inaccurate assumptions and are
subject to various business risks and known and unknown
uncertainties, a number of which are beyond the Company's control.
Therefore, actual results could differ materially from the forward-
looking statements contained herein. A wide variety of factors could
cause or contribute to such differences and could adversely impact
revenues, profitability, cash flows and capital needs. There can be
no assurance that the forward-looking statements contained in this
press release will, in fact, transpire or prove to be accurate. For
a more detailed description of these and other cautionary factors
that may affect Zila's future results, please refer to Zila's Form
10-K for its fiscal year ended July 31, 2005.

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Biotech News - Medipacs Develops New Photo Activated Polymer Actuator

Medipacs Develops New Photo Activated Polymer Actuator

Medipacs, a Tucson AZ. biotech company, has announced the
development of a new photo (light) activated polymer actuator that
can reversibly expand and contract up to 100% in volume.

Tucson, AZ - Medipacs, a Tucson AZ. biotech company, has announced
the development of a new photo (light) activated polymer actuator
that can reversibly expand and contract up to 100% in volume and
produce pressures greater than 2 pounds per square inch when exposed
to certain wavelengths of light. The new patent pending material has
been in development for two years and is intended for use in the
Pulse Activated Cell System or PACS. The proprietary PACS Digital
Pump™ technology is being developed by Medipacs to drive or pump
fluids for drug delivery and infusion therapies in the medical
market.

The new photo activated polymer is a major breakthrough in an effort
to develop an extremely low energy consuming pump system. This
polymer will enable systems and systems components that use very
little or no electrical power at all. and it is viewed as a major
building block of the Medipacs system and components. Company
spokesperson Laurie Hassey envisions its use beyond medical devices
and as a new alternative energy technology. "Once you realize that
by simply exposing the material to light generates movement of the
material you start to see the possibilities. We envision uses from
water pumps for remote areas and third world countries to active
materials that can bend or track in the direction of the sun, in
much the same way a living plant does. These and other concepts take
advantage of a photo chemical process in the polymer and do not need
any electrical power to create movement."

Medipacs is a startup company at the Arizona Center for Innovation a
business incubator located at the University of Arizona Science and
Technology Park. The company is developing the next generation of
medical pump and drug delivery devices that interact with the
patient, autonomously monitoring, mixing and delivering drugs and
fluids according to the patients needs. Future devices are in the
form of pre-dosed patches, ambulatory monitors with interactive
pumps, artificial organs and bioreactors.

The Medipacs device is not FDA approved and is in research and
development stages.

This news release may contain forward looking information. Actual
future results may differ materially from those contemplated. The
risks, uncertainties and other factors, both known & unknown, could
influence actual results may be substantial & include those
described in documents filed with regulatory authorities. No
assurances can be given that any of the events anticipated by the
forward looking statements will transpire or occur, or if any of
them do so, what benefits the company will derive there from.

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Biotech News - InNexus Enters R&D Agreement Targeting Cancer with BioInvent of Sweden IXS

InNexus Enters R&D Agreement Targeting Cancer with BioInvent of
Sweden, Appoints New Chairman of the Board of Directors
Sep 27 2006

InNexus Biotechnology, Inc. an innovative antibody-driven drug
development company, today announced that it has entered into an R&D
agreement with BioInvent International AB, a publicly-traded biotech
firm, for the provision of InNexus' SuperAntibody(TM) Technology
with a BioInvent therapeutic antibody, targeting cancer. Under the
agreement the Parties will perform collaborative R&D aimed at a
single target. The agreement also contains terms for future drug
development including commercialization. Financial terms of the
transaction were not disclosed.

InNexus also announced today that its Board of Directors has
appointed Jeff Morhet Chairman of the Board, to lead the company's
growth and drug development strategy. Mr. Morhet serves as the
President and CEO of InNexus and has extensive experience in the
pharmaceutical industry.

Commenting on the agreement with BioInvent, Mr. Morhet, President,
CEO & Chairman of InNexus said, "We are delighted to be entering
into this relationship with BioInvent as our extensive antibody
enhancement experience underpins all of our technologies. This
enables us to offer state of the art support to pharmaceutical and
drug development companies as we seek to increase antibody potency,
an achievement already demonstrated with other multiple fully human
and humanized antibodies. The impact of such a demonstration is to
not only produce a more effective drug candidate but to also use
less drug, a key to the drug's cost of goods and profit."

Mr. Morhet concluded, "This agreement also demonstrates InNexus'
ability and commitment to develop SuperAntibody(TM) Technology into
commercial product opportunities internally and for our partners."

About InNexus

InNexus is an innovative antibody-driven drug development company
that has developed two technology platforms, SuperAntibody(TM) and
TransMAbs(TM), which improve the potency of existing antibody
products while opening new markets and disease applications. Both
platforms utilize unique, novel and patented methods and
technologies of InNexus. InNexus is headquartered in Scottsdale,
Arizona on the campus of The Mayo Clinic and has its own in-house
developmental facilities. These development facilities provide
validation of protein and peptide discoveries, enabling InNexus (and
its strategic partners) to advance novel drug therapeutics and
diagnostics. To learn more about InNexus, please visit
www.innexusbiotech.com.

About BioInvent

BioInvent International AB, listed on the O list of the Stockholm
Stock Exchange (SAX:BINV), is a research-based pharmaceutical
company that focuses on development of antibody-based drugs. The
Company is running innovative drug projects within the areas of
thrombosis, oncology, atherosclerosis, ophthalmic diseases and HIV.
The Company, which currently has 99 employees, is located at Ideon
in Lund, Sweden.

This news release contains forward-looking statements within the
meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.
These statements are not historical facts and are subject to risks
and uncertainties which could cause actual results and the timing of
certain events to differ materially from those set forth in or
implied herein including, without limitation, risks associated with
clinical development, regulatory approvals, product
commercialization, intellectual property claims litigation and other
risks associated with the company's proposed activities.

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Monday, October 16, 2006

Biotech News - MedServe Receives $70 Million in Equity Funding

MedServe Receives $70 Million in Equity Funding
Avista Capital Partners, combined the investment with an additional
$20 million in existing shareholder commitments and debt conversion

Houston, TX.- MedServe, Inc. has completed another round of
capitalization to fund the company's continued consolidation of
local and regional operators in the medical waste industry
nationwide. With an investment commitment of $50 million from Avista
Capital Partners, combined with an additional $20 million in
existing shareholder commitments and debt conversion, MedServe
management believes it has sufficient equity funding to achieve its
goal of more than $150 million in annual revenues. At least three
transactions are expected to close by year-end 2006 with several
more planned for 2007.

Avista Capital Partners joins Chrysalis Ventures II, L.P., Murphree
Venture Partners VI, L.P., Cogene Biotech Ventures II, L.P. and
Erasmus Louisiana Growth Fund, L.P. in capitalizing MedServe's
aggressive expansion plans.

MedServe's management has completed eight acquisitions over the past
18 months in its quest to become the second largest company in the
medical waste management sector. These acquisitions, combined with
strong organic growth, have tripled MedServe's customer base and
quadrupled revenues in the first nine months of 2006. The company is
led by Roger Ramsey, former founder and chief executive officer of
Allied Waste Industries and co-founder of Browning Ferris Industries
(BFI), and Mike Fields, former president of BFI Medical Waste.

"The medical waste industry is very fragmented with the exception of
one large, single national player. There's a compelling opportunity
for a strong second player to emerge through consolidation," said
MedServe Chairman and CEO Roger Ramsey. "MedServe already has a
proven track record of successful add-on acquisitions since our
formation in 2005. We appreciate the support of our investors to
allow us to forge ahead to build towards a national footprint."


MedServe, based in Houston, Texas, currently has an active public
and private hospital, patient clinic, physician and laboratory
customer base primarily in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Mississippi,
Missouri, Kansas, Arizona and Southern California. MedServe
President Mike Fields noted, "Current letters of intent should allow
us to expand into at least two additional geographic markets by year
end."

About MedServe
MedServe Inc., with its Med-Shred, Enserv and Envirosolve
subsidiaries, is headquartered in Houston, Texas. We serve hospitals
and smaller-quantity medical waste generators across the Southeast,
Southwest, West and Midwest, providing turnkey medical waste
management solutions. These turnkey services include high quality
mobile medical waste treatment services, waste liability management,
waste minimization programs, sharps tracking and retrieval and
medical and hazardous waste collection, transport, treatment and
disposal.

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Biotech News - HTG Appoints William Radany CEO - HTG, Inc.

HTG Appoints William Radany CEO

HTG, Inc., a provider of novel array-based gene expression assay
technology and services for the life sciences industry, today
announced the appointment of Dr. William Radany to the position of
chief executive officer. He replaces Kirk Collamer who will remain
with the company as the chief financial officer. Dr. Radany joins
HTG from Chemicon International, one of the leading resources for
immunological reagents, immunodiagnostics, and molecular biology
products, where he was vice president of business segment
management.

"Bill Radany is a proven industry leader who brings more than 20
years of experience in the pharmaceutical and drug discovery
technologies industries to HTG," said Bruce Seligmann, chairman,
HTG. "His strong leadership and management skills will be
instrumental in guiding the company's pursuit of both short and long-
term growth objectives."

"I am excited to work closely with the Board of Directors and the
management team at HTG to continue to bring the Company's gene
expression profiling technology to the forefront of drug discovery
research. HTG's technology platform brings tremendous value to lab
researchers," said Dr. Radany. "With my experience at life sciences
and biotech companies alike, I'm looking forward to applying my
experience and insight at HTG to take the business to the next level
and expand the Company's customer base which currently includes
leading pharmaceutical companies such as Merck & Co., Sanofi
Aventis, Bristol Meyers Squibb, Celgene and Takeda, Inc."

Prior to Chemicon International, Dr. Radany was chief business
officer at Xencor where he headed up corporate strategy for
partnering of Xencor proteomics technologies. He has also served as
vice president of drug discovery programs at both Caliper
Technologies Corp. and Strategene respectively. Prior to Strategene,
Dr. Radany was president of Biacore, a proteomics technology company
and previously founded the in vitro diagnostic cell culture company
NeoGenex and subsequently sold the Company to Diagnostic Hybrids,
Inc.

Dr. Radany earned a B.S. in cell biology from Colorado State
University and a doctorate in biochemistry/physiology from the
University of Wyoming.

HTG's ArrayPlate qNPA(TM) technology is used to carry out
quantitative multiplexed, gene-based drug discovery programs,
including target validation, HTS lead optimization, metabolism,
toxicology and clinical development. HTG's ArrayPlate lysis-only
quantitative Nuclease Protection Assay (qNPA(TM)) platform allows
scientists to test any sample while avoiding the need for extraction
or target amplification. The platform provides robust, high-quality
quantitative test results, including QSAR-quality dose response data
and EC50's, enabling clients to compress drug discovery and
development program timelines, increase program success and reduce
costs.

About HTG

HTG provides ArrayPlate qNPA technology and services for the life
sciences industry, addressing current unmet needs and enabling a new
era of drug discovery and diagnostics. The company's ArrayPlate
technology platform enables the accurate, sensitive, reproducible
and repeatable measurement of molecular signatures through the
multiplexed measurement of RNA expression levels, DNA and protein
levels and function. ArrayPlate qNPA data measure how drugs act and
diseases are mediated at the level of whole cells, tissues, or
organisms. This enables researchers to focus their resources by
rapidly obtaining higher quality results than possible with other
methods, in days rather than months, saving time and cost while
addressing critical unmet needs. Privately-held HTG is based in
Tucson, Arizona. Investors in the company include Solstice Capital,
Valley Ventures, and Village Ventures. Additional information is
available at www.htgenomics.com.

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Thursday, October 12, 2006

Biotech News - Researchers Publish Results of Largest Genome-Wide Linkage Study of Prostate Can

Researchers Publish Results of Largest Genome-Wide Linkage Study of
Prostate Cancer Among African American Men

Collaborative effort may open doors to improved diagnosis and
treatment

10-11-2006

Phoenix, AZ, October 11, 2006--Researchers from 14 institutions
across the country today announced the results of the first genome-
wide linkage study of prostate cancer in African Americans. Using
genetic markers, researchers identified several regions of the human
genome that likely contain genes that, when altered, increase the
risk of developing prostate cancer.
The study was conceived, implemented and executed primarily by
African American investigators. Published in the journal, The
Prostate, the AAHPC is a milestone in years of research designed to
identify genetic risk factors for prostate cancer and to help
determine if heredity plays a role in the disparity in prostate
cancer rates seen among African American men.

The African American Hereditary Prostate Cancer Study Network
(AAHPC) recruited 77 African American extended families, which
encompassed a total of 418 men with prostate cancer, to participate
in this study. All of the families studied had at least four men who
have been diagnosed with prostate cancer. Using genetic markers,
researchers were able to map several important regions of the human
genome that likely contain genes that, when mutated, predispose
these men to developing prostate cancer.

"We now must sift through millions of bases of genome sequence to
identify the proverbial 'needle in the haystack'," said John
Carpten, PhD, senior author and director of TGen's Integrated Cancer
Genomics Division. "The discovery of these genes will hopefully lead
to new and improved modes of diagnosis and treatment for some men
with prostate cancer. This work speaks to our committed efforts to
help reduce the disparity in prostate cancer rates seen among
African American men."

According to the National Cancer Institute, the incidence of
prostate cancer among African American men is 277 per 100,000
compared to 168 per 100,000 for white men. The annual death rate
from prostate cancer is 73 per 100,000 for African American men
compared 30 per 100,000 for white men. This means that the incidence
of prostate cancer is about two times higher in African American men
who are three times more likely to die from this disease. Family
history is the most significant risk factor known for prostate
cancer among all men, including African Americans.

"We hope today's findings-and the discoveries we expect to make in
future years-will inspire the worldwide research community to view
this study as a model for many other genetic studies of common
diseases," said Francis S. Collins, MD, PhD, director of the
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), which is part of
the National Institutes of Health. "Not only does this study
represent one of the most impressive collections of prostate cancer
families from any ethnic group, it demonstrates the importance of
setting up a network of principal investigators who are close to the
community under study."

The paper's first author, Agnes B. Baffoe-Bonnie, MD, MPH, PhD, who
is an associate member at the Population Science Division at the Fox
Chase Cancer Center (FCCC) in Philadelphia, said these findings
greatly add to our understanding of hereditary prostate cancer in
African Americans. "I commend the many families who took the time to
participate in this important research and praise their commitment
to advancing medical knowledge. These important findings will be
applied to prevention and treatment strategies," Dr. Baffoe-Bonnie
said.

AAHPC is the largest study to date that focuses on prostate cancer
in African American families. The families studied came from
Chicago, Detroit, Houston, New York, Washington, D.C., Atlanta and
South Carolina.

"Since this disease is so important in this population, this is a
critical study in terms of our ability to understand the molecular
mechanisms responsible for the disproportionate risk observed in
African American men for both diagnosis of and mortality from
prostate cancer," said William B. Isaacs, PhD, of Johns Hopkins
University School of Medicine in Baltimore, who is head of the
International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics. "The mapping
information provided by these researchers will provide essential
information necessary for the ultimate identification of the genes
involved, and hopefully for mechanistically based efforts to address
this disparity."

The AAHPC was a collaborative effort involving 12 institutions
nationwide including TGen; Fox Chase Cancer Center; NHGRI; the
Comprehensive Cancer Center at the Ohio State University in
Columbus; the National Human Genome Center, the Department of
Microbiology and the Division of Urology at Howard University,
Washington; Midtown Urology in Atlanta, the Columbia-Presbyterian
Medical Center in New York; the Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago;
the MD Anderson Medical Center in Houston; the University of
Illinois in Chicago; the University of South Carolina in Columbia;
and the Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University in
Detroit.

How to Create a Family Health History
To help people in the task of creating their family health
histories, the U.S. Department of Heath and Human Services offers a
free, computerized tool that organizes health information into a
printout that can be can taken to health-care professionals. The
tool, called "My Family Health Portrait," is available at
https://familyhistory.hhs.gov/.

# # #

About TGen
The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), a non-profit
501(c)(3) organization, is focused on developing earlier diagnostics
and smarter treatments. Translational genomics research is a
relatively new field employing innovative advances arising from the
Human Genome Project and applying them to the development of
diagnostics, prognostics and therapies for cancer, neurological
disorders, diabetes and other complex diseases. TGen's research is
based on personalized medicine and the institute plans to accomplish
its goals through robust and disease-focused research.

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Monday, October 09, 2006

MedServe Receives $70 Million in Equity Funding

MedServe Receives $70 Million in Equity Funding
Avista Capital Partners, combined the investment with an additional
$20 million in existing shareholder commitments and debt conversion



Houston, TX.- MedServe, Inc. has completed another round of capitalization to fund the company’s continued consolidation of local and regional operators in the medical waste industry nationwide. With an investment commitment of $50 million from Avista Capital Partners, combined with an additional $20 million in existing shareholder commitments and debt conversion, MedServe management believes it has sufficient equity funding to achieve its goal of more than $150 million in annual revenues. At least three transactions are expected to close by year-end 2006 with several more planned for 2007.

Avista Capital Partners joins Chrysalis Ventures II, L.P., Murphree Venture Partners VI, L.P., Cogene Biotech Ventures II, L.P. and Erasmus Louisiana Growth Fund, L.P. in capitalizing MedServe’s aggressive expansion plans.

MedServe’s management has completed eight acquisitions over the past 18 months in its quest to become the second largest company in the medical waste management sector. These acquisitions, combined with strong organic growth, have tripled MedServe’s customer base and quadrupled revenues in the first nine months of 2006. The company is led by Roger Ramsey, former founder and chief executive officer of Allied Waste Industries and co-founder of Browning Ferris Industries (BFI), and Mike Fields, former president of BFI Medical Waste.

More

Arizona biotech companies offer hope for canine dry eye

Arizona biotech companies offer hope for canine dry eye
The Business Journal of Phoenix - October 4, 2006by Angela GonzalesThe Business Journal


Imulan BioTherapeutics and Cynexus Corp. announced Wednesday completion of their first pilot study using a new biomaterial to treat dogs with refractory dry eye problems.

The two Arizona companies will present the study results in November at the annual conference of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology.


Dr. Randall Woods, ophthalmologist and chief executive of Imulan, said the study demonstrated a slight increase in tear production and a definite reduction in inflammation.

RNAi: Nobel Prize-Winning Biotechnology

RNAi: Nobel Prize-Winning Biotechnology
Drugs based on the technology have a long way to go, but the future does look promising.
THE MOTLEY FOOL


Updated: 7:15 a.m. MT Oct 5, 2006
The Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine was awarded earlier this week. It went to Andrew Fire of Stanford University and Craig Mello of the University of Massachusetts Medical School for their work in RNA interference (RNAi). This technology is relatively young by Nobel standards, with the acknowledged research being completed less than 10 years ago. RNAi works by targeting messenger RNA and preventing it from being translated into protein, thus "knocking down" specific gene products. It is similar to antisense technology developed a decade earlier, but has so far proven more robust and effective.

The biotechnology industry has been quick to recognize and adopt RNAi as a tool in drug development programs, and to explore its potential as a therapeutic entity itself.

More

Phoenix Arizona

UNC Charlotte To Host Annual Biotechnology Conference On Oct. 12

UNC Charlotte To Host Annual Biotechnology Conference On Oct. 12
Special To LTW

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – The fifth annual “Charlotte’s Emerging Role in Biotechnology” conference is set for Thursday, Oct. 12.

More than 200 biotech and industry leaders are expected to attend the daylong event, which is put on by the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

Keynote speaker is Mark Arizmendi, president of Angiogen, a Charlotte-based firm that is developing treatments for cancerous tumors.

Arizona Biotech

Thursday, October 05, 2006

AmpliMed® Named “Arizona Bioscience Company of the Year” and “Arizona Company to Watch”

AmpliMed® Named “Arizona Bioscience Company of the Year” and “Arizona Company to Watch”

Leading Drug Development Company Recognized by Business Associations for Innovation in Bioscience and Contribution to Arizona Economy

Tucson, Arizona, June 2, 2006 - AmpliMed today announced that the Company has received two awards from Arizona business associations for its outstanding accomplishments and achievements over the past year. At an awards ceremony held on May 31, the cancer drug development company was named “Bioscience Company of the Year” by the Arizona BioIndustry Association (ABA). AmpliMed was also named an “Arizona Company to Watch” by the Arizona Small Business Association (ASBA) during a ceremony on June 1.

AmpliMed was recognized by the ABA for its accomplishments in the research and development of drugs that may make a significant contribution to the treatment of several different types of cancer, including pancreatic cancer, malignant melanoma and multiple myeloma. AmpliMed’s drugs have been shown to kill cancer cells in ways which are distinct from many other anti-cancer drugs, and they are being studied alone and in combination with commonly used cancer therapies in several clinical trials. The ASBA honored AmpliMed as a successful, growing second-stage company that is a vital driver of the state’s economy. AmpliMed is among 50 local companies recognized for its contribution and innovation in the state.

“On behalf of the Arizona BioIndustry Association, I am pleased to congratulate AmpliMed on its achievement of being named Bioscience Company of the Year for 2006,” said Jon McGarity, president and CEO of the Arizona BioIndustry Association. “AmpliMed is an active member of the ABA and we are impressed by its commitment and contribution to the development of the biosciences in the state of Arizona.”

“AmpliMed is an outstanding example of a second-stage growth company that is being recognized statewide as an innovator, economic driver and workforce developer,” said Charlie O’Dowd, southern director, Arizona Small Business Association.


About the ABA
The Arizona BioIndustry Association is the statewide organization promoting the growth of bioindustry through member services, education, business networking, public policy and entrepreneurial endeavors.


About the ASBA
The Arizona Small Business Association (ASBA) is a non-profit corporation organized to provide services, benefits, information and legislative representation to its members and to contribute to the growth and success of its members’ businesses.

About AmpliMed Corporation
AmpliMed Corporation was founded in 1989 with the support of the University of Arizona Technology Development Corporation and is focused on the clinical development of chemotherapeutic agents for cancer. AmpliMed’s strategy is to develop anti-cancer drugs with novel mechanisms of action designed to overcome some of the limitations, such as myelosuppression (suppression of blood cell counts), multi-drug resistance (treatment-induced resistance to many cancer drugs) and cardiac toxicity, frequently associated with current cancer therapy. The company’s lead product, Amplimexon (imexon inj.), is undergoing NDA-directed clinical development. Other products in the company's portfolio include Amplizone™, which is anticipated to enter the clinic early in 2006, and a portfolio of derivatives of both lead compounds for future development. AmpliMed Corporation is based in Tucson, Arizona and is on the Web at http://www.amplimed.com. .

###

AmpliMed, Amplimexon and Amplizone are United States trademarks of AmpliMed Corporation.

Biotech

US Scientists Develop Sensors Based on Carbon Nanotubes

US Scientists Develop Sensors Based on Carbon Nanotubes
Nanotechnology market is growing rapidly and carbon nanotubes based sensors, developed by a team of US based scientists, make the latest entrant to it.

Sep 26, 2006 - A team of scientists from Motorola Labs and Arizona State University is said to have developed carbon nanotubes based sensors. According to the team, the new devices successfully detected heavy metal ions’ presence in water caused by parts per trillion levels.

Specifically, researchers said that they had developed a method to apply peptides to single walled nanotubes of carbon in field effect transistors. This is a rather common sensor platform for all types of applications. Heavy metal ions is checked in water, however, the platform may be applied to various other areas for sensing toxic chemicals propagating in the air, or can be used in medicine as biosensors.

In its recently published market research report “The World Nanotechnology Market (2006)” on Nanotechnology RNCOS has provided an analytical overview of Global Nanotechnology Market. According to this report, “Dow Corning, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Samsung, IBM, Agilent and Motorola, are a few of the firms that are already developing Nanosensor arrays”.





“Nanosensor market, which was at $238.45Mn in 2005, is likely to reach to $300Mn towards the end of 2006. The market will almost touch a mark of $592 million worldwide by 2009”, as per an industry expert at RNCOS.

The research report addresses the issues and facts that are critical to the success of Global Nanotechnology industry, such as:

- Worldwide outlook of Nanotechnology market.
- Study of Nanotechnology market by a variety of products and application areas.
- Opportunities for growth of Nanotechnology technology.
- Challenges and Key driver for the technology.
- Recent developments in Nanotechnology market.
- Profiles of key players in this sector.

The report

Provides an updated and detailed overview of Nanotechnology market worldwide. It examines the emerging trends in the industry and provides exclusive of the industry. It includes the snapshots of different players in the industry, discussion on R&D activities in various countries and studies the patents in this technology.

About RNCOS:

RNCOS, incorporated in 2002, provides Market Research Reports for your business needs and aims to put an end to your information pursuit. Our expertise in gathering global business information for industry research, corporate training, growth consulting, and business consulting, brings reputed companies and firms to us for business enhancement solutions. We can be your one-stop-shop for Industry research information and niche market analysis

Weblog Award

Famous People

Wednesday, October 04, 2006

Biotech News - Local Biotech GenoSensor Signs Exclusive Deal with German Life-Science Company


Local Biotech GenoSensor Signs Exclusive Deal with German Life-Science Company BioCat.

Tempe, Arizona, USA October 2, 2006


Tempe based GenoSensor Corporation officially launched its microRNA product line into the European market today by signing a distribution deal with German life science company BioCat GmbH. The move was strategic for both parties, giving GenoSensor penetration into the vast life science and pharmaceutical markets in the European Union, while allowing BioCat to have exclusive distribution rights to the unique product line. After watching GenoSensor grow during the past year, BioCat proposed the deal, realizing the international recognition GenoSensor's products were receiving.


About GenoSensor
GenoSensor is a privately held biotechnology company aiming to improve lives by providing genomic research products and services worldwide for gene _expression profiling and genotyping, biomarker discovery, target validation, therapeutic assessment, and other bioscience applications. Major products include microRNA profiling packages, as well as custom dna-arrays for gene _expression and genotyping. http://www.genosensorcorp.com/.

About BioCat
BioCat GmbH provides innovative tools and services for research in molecular and cell biology. Products and services are provided by BioCat´s partners in the USA, Korea, Taiwan, Russia, Finnland and Germany. BioCat is committed to a dedicated customer service by providing application oriented solutions. http://www.biocat.com.de/

Submitted by:

Daniel Johnson
Product Manager
GenoSensor Corporation
(480)598-5378
4665 South Ash Avenue
Suite G-18
Tempe, Arizona 85282
USA
http://www.genosensorcorp.com/

Arizona Biotech
Biotech News
AZhttp, Inc.

Biotech News - TGen Researcher Honored by Science Spectrum Magazine

TGen Researcher Honored by Science Spectrum Magazine

Dr. John Carpten named a top minority in science

10-03-2006

October 3, Phoenix, AZ--Dr. John Carpten, senior investigator and
director of the Integrated Cancer Genomics Division at the
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), has been named
a "Trailblazer" by Science Spectrum magazine. The Trailblazers are
outstanding Hispanic, Asian American, Native American, and Black
professionals in the science arena whose leadership and innovative
thinking on the job and in the community extend throughout and
beyond their industry.
Selected by the magazine's editors, the chosen winners have all made
a significant, quantifiable, personal impact on the industry and
their communities. Many maintain a powerful position of influence
regarding public policy for minorities in science.


Dr. John Carpten, senior investigator and director of TGen's
Integrated Cancer Genomics Division was recently named
a "Trailblazer" by Science Spectrum magazine. The trailblazer award
is presented to Black, Hispanic, Asian American, and Native American
professionals in the science arena whose leadership and innovative
thinking on the job and in the community extend throughout and
beyond their industry.

"There is an immediacy associated with helping patients with cancer
and it is this immediacy that drives my research forward," said Dr.
Carpten. "It is a such an honor to be recognized by Science Spectrum
magazine and I hope to set an example for other minorities in the
field of science."

Dr. Carpten's work at TGen is focused on searching for genetic
identifiers that will act as predictors for prostate cancer, a
disease whose incidence is three times more likely in African
American men and six times more likely to lead to death in that
population. He is currently leading the effort to conduct the most
in-depth study of its kind designed to scan the genomes of families
with prostate cancer to identify genetic risk factors for the
disease. Once these risk factors are identified, scientists can use
that information to develop diagnostic and prognostic tools to help
physicians treat their patients. His research in this area is
supported by the National Cancer Institute at the National
Institutes of Health.

In addition to prostate cancer, Dr. Carpten is also working on adult
hematological malignancies, particularly multiple myeloma, a disease
that again disproportionately affects African Americans. In
collaboration with Mayo Clinic Scottsdale and Agilent Technologies,
Dr. Carpten's studies are focused on identifying important
biomarkers associated with multiple myeloma development.

He is also the laboratory project leader for the Multiple Myeloma
Genomic Initiative, a multi-million dollar research program designed
to rapidly accelerate progress made against multiple myeloma by
significantly improving the understanding of the biology of the
disease. This initiative is the most comprehensive research
collaboration of its kind that focuses on cancer genomics. This work
is funded through the Multiple Myeloma Research Consortium.

"Dr. Carpten is an exceptionally talented cancer investigator with
an unparalleled compassion for patients and dedication to finding
answers," said Dr. Jeffrey Trent, TGen's Scientific Director. "His
work stands at the forefront of bringing laboratory results into
clinical benefit."

# # #

About TGen
The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a non-profit
501(c)(3) organization focused on developing earlier diagnostics and
smarter treatments. Translational genomics research is a relatively
new field employing innovative advances arising from the Human
Genome Project and applying them to the development of diagnostics,
prognostics and therapies for cancer, neurological disorders,
diabetes and other complex diseases. TGen's research is based on
personalized medicine. The institute plans to accomplish its goals
through robust and disease-focused research.


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Biotech News - NHGRI Aims to Make DNA Sequencing Faster, More Cost Effective

NHGRI Aims to Make DNA Sequencing Faster, More Cost Effective
New Grants Support Quest to Develop Next Generation of Sequencing
Technologies

Bethesda, Md. – The National Human Genome Research Institute
(NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), today
announced the latest round of grant awards totaling more than $13.3
million to speed the development of innovative sequencing
technologies that reduce the cost of DNA sequencing and expand the
use of genomics in medical research and health care.

"There has been significant progress over the last several years to
develop faster and more cost-effective sequencing technologies and,
we are committed to supporting these innovative efforts to benefit
scientific labs and medical clinics," said NHGRI Director Francis S.
Collins, M.D., Ph.D. "These technologies will eventually
revolutionize the way that biomedical research and the practice of
medicine are done."

Since 1990, NHGRI has invested approximately $380 million to develop
and improve DNA sequencing technologies. DNA sequencing costs have
fallen more than 50-fold over the past decade, fueled in large part
by tools, technologies and process improvements developed as part of
the successful project to sequence the human genome. However, it
still costs around $10 million to sequence 3 billion base pairs –
the amount of DNA found in the genomes of humans and other mammals.

NHGRI's near-term goal is to lower the cost of sequencing a
mammalian-sized genome to $100,000, allowing researchers to sequence
the genomes of hundreds or even thousands of people participating in
studies to identify genes that contribute to common, complex
diseases. Ultimately, NHGRI's vision is to cut the cost of whole-
genome sequencing to $1,000 or less, which will enable the
sequencing of an individual's genome during routine medical care.
The ability to sequence an individual genome cost-effectively could
enable health care professionals to tailor diagnosis, treatment and
prevention to each person's unique genetic profile.

The new grants will fund nine investigators developing revolutionary
technologies that may make it feasible to sequence a genome for
$1,000, as well as two investigators developing "near term"
technologies to sequence a genome for $100,000. Both approaches have
many complementary elements that integrate biochemistry, chemistry
and physics with engineering to enhance the whole effort to develop
the next generation of DNA sequencing and analysis technologies.
Since 2004, NHGRI has awarded $83 million to investigators to
develop both "near term" and revolutionary sequencing technologies.

"It is very important that we encourage and support the development
of innovative sequencing technologies. Many of these new approaches
have shown significant promise, yet far more exploration and
development are needed if they are to be useful to the average
researcher or physician," said Jeffery Schloss, Ph.D., NHGRI's
program director for technology development. "We look forward to
seeing which of these technologies fulfill their promise and achieve
the quantum leaps that are needed to take DNA sequencing to the next
level."

"$1,000 Genome" Grants

NHGRI's "Revolutionary Genome Sequencing Technologies" grants have
as their goal the development of breakthrough technologies that will
enable a human-sized genome to be sequenced for $1,000 or less.
Grant recipients and their approximate total funding are:

John Nelson, Ph.D., General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna,
N.Y. $900,000 (2 years) "Closed Complex Single Molecule Sequencing"

This team will use existing enzyme and dye-tagged nucleotide
resources, the building block of DNA, in a novel way that will
simplify the fundamental, front-end chemistry of massively parallel
sequencing-by-synthesis. This method uses the natural catalytic
cycle of DNA polymerase to capture just a single DNA base on an
immobilized primer/template. A fluorescence scanner will be used to
scan and identify hundreds of thousand of molecules at once. Then
the cycle will be repeated. This phased award will increase if
specific milestones are met in the initial experiments.

J. Michael Ramsey, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
$3.8 million (4 years) "Nanoscale Fluidic Technologies for Rapidly
Sequencing Single DNA Molecules"

A nanometer is one-billionth of a meter, much too small to be seen
with a conventional lab microscope. Several groups are developing
nanopores (holes about 2 nanometers in diameter) for use as DNA
sequence transducers and propose to detect an electrical, or ionic,
signal from individual DNA molecules. The goal of this group is to
fabricate nanoscale channels in which single molecules of DNA will
pass between nano-electrodes that are less than 2 nanometers apart,
to measure an electric current that will identify individual bases.

Xiaohua Huang, Ph.D., University of California, San Diego, La Jolla
$275,000 (1 year) "Genome Sequencing by Ligation Using Nano-Arrays
of Single DNA Molecules"

Using an experimental method for DNA sequencing called "single
molecule sequencing by ligation," this project aims to develop a
method for fabricating high-density arrays of wells with sub-
micrometer dimensions for ordering single nanoparticles and DNA
molecules. The investigator will attempt to demonstrate that more
than 1 billion individual DNA molecules can be sequenced in massive
parallel though a process involving cyclic sequencing by ligation, a
process where an enzyme is used to join pieces of DNA together. This
phased award will increase if specific milestones are met in the
initial experiments.

Amit Meller, Ph.D., Boston University, Boston $2.2 million (3
years) "High-Throughput DNA Sequencing Using Design Polymers and
Nanopore Arrays"

This group will continue to implement a novel approach previously
funded through this program in which a nanopore is used to
simultaneously detect electrical and fluorescent signals from many
nanopores at one time. A novel sequencing instrument will be
fabricated, along with additional analysis tools, with the aim of
producing a viable, low-cost sequencing system.

Timothy D. Harris, Ph.D., Helicos Biosciences Corporation,
Cambridge, Mass. $2 million (3 years) "High Accuracy Single Molecule
DNA Sequencing by Synthesis"

This team of investigators has developed a fully automated
instrument capable of sequencing single molecules of DNA on a planar
surface. The group is now developing a high-throughput version of
this technology for the re-sequencing of whole human genomes. The
sequencing strategy involves obtaining short reads (about 25 DNA
bases) from billions of strands of DNA immobilized on a surface
inside a reagent flow cell. The research plan aims to advance this
strategy to achieve high accuracy, re-sequencing of highly variable
genomes and assembly of never-before sequenced genomes.

Dmitri V. Vezenov, Ph.D., Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Penn.
$905,000 (3 years) "Force Spectroscopy Platform for Label Free
Genome Sequencing"

This team will apply force spectroscopy, a technique used to
understand the mechanical properties of polymer molecules or
chemical bonds, to DNA undergoing arrested polymerization to
initially demonstrate one-molecule-at-a-time analysis of changes in
molecular mechanics at a resolution of a single base. Using optical,
near-field probes, the methods of force spectroscopy can be advanced
into techniques having massively parallel format, where millions of
single DNA base additions can be followed at the same time. The
identification of bases will be done exclusively on the basis of
changes experienced by the molecule as a whole. The team aims to
fabricate a low cost table-top setup suitable for use in a majority
of biological, chemical and hospital laboratories.

Peiming Zhang, Ph.D., Arizona State University, Tempe, Ariz.
$895,000 (3 years) "Fabrication of Universal DNA Nanoarrays for
Sequencing by Hybridization"

Expanding the performance of the sequencing-by-synthesis technology,
this group will develop a cost-effective method to fabricate
universal DNA nanoarrays using nano-contact printing. The current
photolithography technology can cause damage to DNA probes, which
the group will strive to avoid by using nano-contact printing. With
the nano-sized features, a DNA nanoarray can also improve throughput
by offering the ability to accommodate billions of DNA molecules in
a small area. Hybridization will be detected by atomic force
microscopy.

Carlos H. Mastrangelo, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University,
Cleveland $815,000 (3 years) "Large-Scale Nanopore Arrays for DNA
Sequencing"

This team will aim to develop highly integrated arrays of nanopores
that can be fabricated by lithographic methods, along with on-chip
silicon-based electronic circuits and circuit techniques that
amplify and isolate their various electrical signals. This group
will also design a dipole-sensing methodology, which in principle
can distinguish signals from each of the DNA bases. Arrays of
nanopores will be constructed on silicon substrates using a self-
aligned compositional approach. Quadrature dipole moment detectors
will be constructed that yield a signal independent of the rotation
of the DNA molecule relative to the electrodes.

Jens Gundlach, Ph.D., University of Washington, Seattle $605,000 (2
years) "Engineering MspA for Nanopore Sequencing"

The passage of single-strand DNA through a nanopore using
electrophoresis, a method using an applied electric field to analyze
molecular structures, has the potential to become an inexpensive,
ultrafast DNA sequencing technique. Most current research in
nanopore sequencing involves the protein pore, a-hemolysin; or
artificial pores in inorganic materials. This investigator will
explore the use of a different protein pore, Mycobacterium smegmatis
porin A (MspA), as a new tool for nanopore sequencing.

"$100,000 Genome" Grants

NHGRI's "Near-Term Development for Genome Sequencing" grants will
support research aimed at sequencing a human-sized genome at 100
times lower cost than is possible today. There is strong potential
that, in less than five years, several of these technologies will be
at or near commercial availability. Grant recipients in the current
cycle and their approximate total funding are:

Michael L. Metzker, Ph.D., Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor
College of Medicine, Houston $500,000 (1 year) "Ultrafast SBS
(Sequencing by Synthesis) Method for Large-Scale Human Resequencing"

This team has developed a novel type of fluorescent nucleotide that
is modified for sequencing by synthesis. Their goal is to improve
the chemical subunits, called reversible terminators, for use in a
system that will ultimately be used to sequence DNA templates in
high-density arrays, using a sensitive fluorescence detection system.

Steven Jeffrey Gordon, Ph.D., Intelligent Bio-Systems, Inc.,
Worcester, Mass. $425,000 (1 year) "High-Throughput DNA Sequencing
by Synthesis Platform"

The main goal of this project is to develop a high-speed, massively
parallel DNA sequencing system using unique base analogues with
cleavable dye and reversible terminator groups and the sequencing by
synthesis approach. This application is focused on the development
of the subsystems required to construct high-density sample arrays
on glass chips and to run sequencing by synthesis reactions on them
in an automated, high-throughput fashion.

For more details about the NHGRI sequencing technology development
grants, go to http://www.genome.gov/10000368. NHGRI also just
announced the next round of funding under the genome sequencing
technology program. The deadline for applying is Nov. 24, 2006, and
information about the application process can be found at
http://genome.gov/10000990.

Editor's Note: NHGRI Director Francis Collins will participate in a
press conference to announce a $10 million prize offered by the X
Prize Foundation for the creation of rapid genome sequencing
technology. The prize is designed to stimulate competition to speed
up the use of genome sequencing in research and medicine. The press
conference will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2006, in the
13th floor ballroom of the National Press Club, 529 14th Street NW,
Washington, D.C.

NHGRI is one of the 27 institutes and centers at NIH. The NHGRI
Division of Extramural Research supports grants for research and
training and career development at sites nationwide. Additional
information about NHGRI can be found at www.genome.gov.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) — The Nation's Medical
Research Agency — includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a
component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is
the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic,
clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the
causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For
more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.



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TGen Researcher Honored by Science Spectrum Magazine

TGen Researcher Honored by Science Spectrum Magazine


Dr. John Carpten named a top minority in science

10-03-2006

October 3, Phoenix, AZ--Dr. John Carpten, senior investigator and director of the Integrated Cancer Genomics Division at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), has been named a "Trailblazer" by Science Spectrum magazine. The Trailblazers are outstanding Hispanic, Asian American, Native American, and Black professionals in the science arena whose leadership and innovative thinking on the job and in the community extend throughout and beyond their industry.
Selected by the magazine's editors, the chosen winners have all made a significant, quantifiable, personal impact on the industry and their communities. Many maintain a powerful position of influence regarding public policy for minorities in science.



Dr. John Carpten, senior investigator and director of TGen's Integrated Cancer Genomics Division was recently named a "Trailblazer" by Science Spectrum magazine. The trailblazer award is presented to Black, Hispanic, Asian American, and Native American professionals in the science arena whose leadership and innovative thinking on the job and in the community extend throughout and beyond their industry.

"There is an immediacy associated with helping patients with cancer and it is this immediacy that drives my research forward," said Dr. Carpten. "It is a such an honor to be recognized by Science Spectrum magazine and I hope to set an example for other minorities in the field of science."

Dr. Carpten's work at TGen is focused on searching for genetic identifiers that will act as predictors for prostate cancer, a disease whose incidence is three times more likely in African American men and six times more likely to lead to death in that population. He is currently leading the effort to conduct the most in-depth study of its kind designed to scan the genomes of families with prostate cancer to identify genetic risk factors for the disease. Once these risk factors are identified, scientists can use that information to develop diagnostic and prognostic tools to help physicians treat their patients. His research in this area is supported by the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health.

In addition to prostate cancer, Dr. Carpten is also working on adult hematological malignancies, particularly multiple myeloma, a disease that again disproportionately affects African Americans. In collaboration with Mayo Clinic Scottsdale and Agilent Technologies, Dr. Carpten's studies are focused on identifying important biomarkers associated with multiple myeloma development.

He is also the laboratory project leader for the Multiple Myeloma Genomic Initiative, a multi-million dollar research program designed to rapidly accelerate progress made against multiple myeloma by significantly improving the understanding of the biology of the disease. This initiative is the most comprehensive research collaboration of its kind that focuses on cancer genomics. This work is funded through the Multiple Myeloma Research Consortium.

"Dr. Carpten is an exceptionally talented cancer investigator with an unparalleled compassion for patients and dedication to finding answers," said Dr. Jeffrey Trent, TGen's Scientific Director. "His work stands at the forefront of bringing laboratory results into clinical benefit."

# # #

About TGen
The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization focused on developing earlier diagnostics and smarter treatments. Translational genomics research is a relatively new field employing innovative advances arising from the Human Genome Project and applying them to the development of diagnostics, prognostics and therapies for cancer, neurological disorders, diabetes and other complex diseases. TGen's research is based on personalized medicine. The institute plans to accomplish its goals through robust and disease-focused research.



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