Friday, September 15, 2006

Biotech News - TGen Awarded Role in $10 million Breast Cancer Project

TGen Awarded Role in $10 million Breast Cancer Project

Department of Defense grant focuses on developing a new treatment
model for breast cancer

10-14-2006

Phoenix, AZ, September 14, 2006--The Translational Genomics Research
Institute (TGen) has been awarded a primary role in a multi-year,
multi-institutional, $10.7 million grant from the Department of
Defense (DoD) Breast Cancer Research Program. In collaboration with
principal investigators at Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC) in
Philadelphia, the grant is focused on developing a new treatment
model for breast cancer to reverse resistance to anti-estrogen
therapy.
Dr. Heather Cunliffe, head of TGen's Breast and Ovarian Cancer
Research Unit, will collaborate with world-renown breast cancer
expert, Dr. V. Craig Jordan, Vice President and Scientific Director
of Medical Science at FCCC. Dr. Jordan is known his seminal work
that led to the validation of tamoxifen as the first-ever drug to
prevent breast cancer. Used for breast cancer treatment since the
1970s, tamoxifen is also the most widely used drug to treat the
disease.

Although considerable advances in the treatment of breast cancer
have been made during the past 30 years, a significant proportion of
patients who receive anti-estrogen therapies will eventually become
resistant to this type of treatment.

"This grant is a first step in trying to figure out why breast
tumors become resistant to anti-hormone therapy," said Dr. Heather
Cunliffe, head of TGen's Breast and Ovarian Cancer Research
Unit. "Genomic technology, which can measure the behavior of tumors
at a very high resolution, will allow us to develop tests to predict
ahead of time whether a patient will fail anti-hormone therapy or is
likely to acquire resistance to this type of therapy. For a woman
who unfortunately progresses and develops recurrent drug-resistant
breast cancer, we are optimistic our discoveries will identify ways
to reactivate therapeutic sensitivity."

The research conducted under the five-year DoD grant is supported by
preliminary findings that suggest there may indeed be a way to re-
trigger breast tumor cells to become responsive to therapy. The
ultimate goal of the study is to leverage the knowledge of
measurable similarities shared by drug-resistant breast cancers and
translate that knowledge into more accurate prognostic tests and
patient-tailored treatments.

TGen will collaborate with FCCC and Georgetown University in
Washington, DC, to precisely map the genetic and biological events
associated with breast tumor cells that may or may not be sensitive
to anti-estrogen drugs. The results will be analyzed to identify
patterns consistent with resistance to various anti-hormone
therapies. A team at Johns Hopkins University will then conduct
phase I and II clinical studies to evaluate these consistent
patterns prospectively.

"Metastatic breast cancer remains a devastating disease, and TGen's
focus on hormone resistance is a key place to focus our efforts. Dr.
Cunliffe's opportunity to collaborate with Dr. Jordan and
colleagues, could change the way we look at and treat breast
cancer," said TGen President and Scientific Director, Dr. Jeffrey
Trent.

# # #

About TGen
The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a non-profit
501(c)(3) organization focused on developing earlier diagnostics and
smarter treatments. Translational genomics research is a relatively
new field employing innovative advances arising from the Human
Genome Project and applying them to the development of diagnostics,
prognostics and therapies for cancer, neurological disorders,
diabetes and other complex diseases. TGen's research is based on
personalized medicine. The institute plans to accomplish its goals
through robust and disease-focused research.

About Fox Chase
Fox Chase Cancer Center was founded in 1904 in Philadelphia as the
nation's first cancer hospital. In 1974, Fox Chase became one of the
first institutions designated as a National Cancer Institute
Comprehensive Cancer Center. Fox Chase conducts basic, clinical,
population and translational research; programs of prevention,
detection and treatment of cancer; and community outreach. For more
information about Fox Chase activities, visit the Center's web site
at www.fccc.edu or call 1-888-FOX CHASE.

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Thursday, September 14, 2006

Biotech News - International Genomics Consortium and Translational Genomics Research Institute

International Genomics Consortium and Translational Genomics
Research Institute Selected to Lead the Biospecimen Core of the
Cancer Genome Atlas Pilot Project

09-13-2006

Phoenix AZ, September 13, 2006 — The National Cancer Institute (NCI)
and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), both part
of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), today announced the
selection of the International Genomics Consortium (IGC) in
collaboration with the Translational Genomics Research Institute
(TGen) to lead the Human Cancer Biospecimen Core Resource (BCR)
component of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) pilot project.
The Human Genome Project was completed in 2003. Earlier this year,
NIH announced the launch of TCGA, a comprehensive effort to
accelerate our understanding of the molecular basis of cancer
through the application of genome analysis technologies, especially
large-scale genome sequencing.

Cancer is now understood to include more than 200 different
diseases. In all forms of cancer, genomic changes—often specific to
a particular type or stage of cancer—cause disruptions within
cellular pathways that result in uncontrolled cell growth. TCGA will
delve more deeply into the genetic origins leading to this complex
set of diseases by collecting and cataloguing a variety of
individuals' cancer specimens as well as information on their
specific disease. In doing so, TCGA will accelerate new discoveries
and tools that will provide the basis for a new generation of cancer
therapies, diagnostics, and preventive strategies.

TCGA is a 3-year pilot project to determine the feasibility of
cataloging the genomic changes associated with a set of human
cancers. The pilot will involve cancers that will be chosen for
their value in helping to determine the feasibility of a possible
larger-scale project. "The faculty of IGC and TGen are uniquely
qualified to direct this component of the TCGA and their
participation and leadership will be crucial to TCGA's success,"
said Dr. Bert Vogelstein, Director of the Ludwig Center for Cancer
Genetics and Therapeutics at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer
Center of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "The
results of the study they envision will undoubtedly change how we
look at cancer and are likely to move cancer research in entirely
new and productive directions." TCGA is comprised of four
components: 1. The Human Cancer Biospecimen Core Resource (BCR)—Led
by IGC and TGen, the BRC will collect tissue samples that will be
carefully cataloged, processed, checked for quality and stored,
complete with important medical information about the patient.

2. The Cancer Genome Characterization Centers—Several genome
characterization technologies will be used to analyze the genetic
changes involved in cancer onset and progression. The genetic
changes that scientists believe are the most significant will be
further studied by the genome sequencing centers.

3. The Genome Sequencing Centers—Building on the technologies that
were used to complete the Human Genome Project, high-throughput
genome sequencing centers will identify the changes in DNA sequences
associated with specific types of cancer.

4. The Data Management, Bioinformatics and Computational Analysis
Core—The information generated by TCGA will be centrally managed and
entered into public databases as it becomes available, allowing
scientists access to the information during the course of the
project.

"The Cancer Genome Atlas project is a significant undertaking that
can create a scientific milestone that can benefit the
personalization of medicine," said Dr. George Poste, Director of the
Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University

Collectively, genomic and clinical data generated by all the
components of the pilot project will provide the initial
contributions to a comprehensive Web-based resource describing the
genomic "fingerprints" of specific cancer types for use by the
cancer research community. This information should provide powerful
advances in cancer clinical research and disease management.

While the pilot project focuses on only a limited number of tumor
types, its outcomes will allow the NIH to assess the feasibility of
conducting a comprehensive analysis of associated genomic
alterations in the future for all cancer types.

Robert Penny, M.D., Ph.D., Chief Medical and Operating Officer and
Executive Director of expO will serve as the Principal Investigator
for the BCR.

"Our selection to lead the BCR validates our ability to collect and
curate cancer biospecimens and importantly, link them with the
clinical outcomes and gene expression," said Dr. Penny. " Our
mission is to accelerate personalized medicine for patients through
earlier diagnosis, targeted and more rational treatments and
effective prevention."

"As evidenced by the Human Genome Project, the value of public
databases supported by quality science is a concept of tremendous
value to both the public and private sector," said Jeffrey Trent,
PhD, TGen President and Scientific Director. "Our selection is a
credit to the systems, people and the innovation occurring within
the biosciences throughout Arizona."

TGen's core competencies in high-throughput genomic analysis will be
leveraged to assist with the analyte preparation component of the
BCR. These analytes will be utilized by the sequencing centers that
the NCI will select soon as the next step in the Atlas project.

This project will be funded by the National Cancer Institute and the
National Human Genome Research Institute, both part of the National
Institutes of Health, under Contract No. N01-CO-12400 with SAIC-
Frederick, Inc.

# # #

About IGC The International Genomics Consortium (IGC) is a non-
profit medical research foundation established to expand upon the
discoveries of the Human Genome Project and other systematic
sequencing efforts by combining world-class genomic research,
bioinformatics, and diagnostic technologies in the fight against
cancer and other complex genetic diseases. IGC serves numerous
common, unmet needs including: the standardization of the collection
of properly consented tissues of interest, the molecular
characterization of these tissues, and standardization in the
representation of these results. IGC facilitates the transition of
genomic discoveries to improve patient care and increase the speed
in which new diagnostic, prognostic and predictive testing, and new
drug and treatment regimens are developed. Founding support for IGC
was provided by the City of Phoenix and from Maricopa County.

About expO The Expression Project for Oncology (expO) integrates
longitudinal clinical annotation of biospecimens collected with the
assistance of AmeriPath and US Oncology with gene expression data
for a unique and powerful portrait of human malignancies, providing
a remarkable resource available to accelerate the development of
diagnostic markers, prognostic indicators, and therapeutic advances.
Follow-on studies generate an evolving database of cancer that
accommodates complimentary assessments of the disease. ExpO releases
clinically annotated gene expression profiles for tumor specimens
through the National Center for Biotechnology Information web site
at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. The principal support for expO comes
from major sponsors including AmeriPath, Bristol-Myers Squibb,
GlaxoSmithKline, IBM, and Wyeth.

About TGen The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a
non-profit 501(c)(3) organization focused on developing earlier
diagnostics and smarter treatments. Translational genomics research
is a relatively new field employing innovative advances arising from
the Human Genome Project and applying them to the development of
diagnostics, prognostics and therapies for cancer, neurological
disorders, diabetes and other complex diseases. TGen's research is
based on personalized medicine. The institute plans to accomplish
its goals through robust and disease-focused research.

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Sunday, September 03, 2006

Nuvelo, Inc. NUVO - Nuvelo Announces Presentation of rNAPc2 Phase 2 Efficacy Data at World Congress of Cardiology 2006

Nuvelo, Inc. NUVO - Nuvelo Announces Presentation of rNAPc2 Phase 2 Efficacy Data at World Congress of Cardiology 2006


--Nuvelo to Host Conference Call on Tuesday, September 5th at 4:30 p.m.
EDT--

SAN CARLOS, Calif., Aug. 29 /PRNewswire/ -- Nuvelo, Inc. (Nasdaq: NUVO)
today announced that new data from the ANTHEM (Anticoagulation with rNAPc2
To Help Eliminate MACE)/TIMI 32 trial evaluating recombinant nematode
anticoagulant protein c2 (rNAPc2) in patients with acute coronary syndromes
(ACS) will be presented at the World Congress of Cardiology 2006 taking
place from September 2nd through the 5th in Barcelona, Spain. Nuvelo
management will host a conference call to present and discuss the data on
Tuesday, September 5th at 4:30 p.m. EDT.
The presentation details are as follows:
Poster Session (Program #3897): "Tissue-factor/factor VIIa inhibition
with higher-dose rNAPc2 reduces ischemia in patients with NSTE-ACS managed
with an early invasive strategy in ANTHEM-TIMI 32"
Date/Time: Tuesday, September 5, 2006, 8:30 - 12:30 a.m. CEST
Presenter: Robert P. Giugliano, M.D., S.M., investigator, TIMI Study
Group, associate physician, Brigham and Women's Hospital and assistant
professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School
Conference Call Information
Nuvelo will hold a conference call on September 5, 2006 at 4:30 p.m.
Eastern Time to discuss the data presentation. Speakers will include Steven
Deitcher, M.D., vice president and chief medical scientist and Ted W. Love,
M.D., chairman and chief executive officer. To participate in the
conference call, please dial 866-713-8567 for domestic callers and
617-597-5326 for international callers and reference conference passcode,
21826949. A telephone replay of the conference call will be available
through Tuesday, September 12, 2006. To access the replay, please dial
888-286-8010 for domestic callers and 617-801-6888 for international
callers and reference conference passcode, 96057794.
This call is also being webcast by Thomson/CCBN and can be accessed at
Nuvelo's website at http://www.nuvelo.com or by visiting Thomson/CCBN's
StreetEvents Network. Individual investors can listen to the call at
http://www.earnings.com, Thomson's individual investor portal, powered by
StreetEvents. Institutional investors can access the call via Thomson
StreetEvents (http://www.streetevents.com), a password-protected event management
site.
About Nuvelo
Nuvelo, Inc. is dedicated to improving the lives of patients through
the discovery, development and commercialization of novel drugs for acute
cardiovascular and cancer therapy. Nuvelo's development pipeline includes
three acute cardiovascular programs: alfimeprase, a direct-acting
thrombolytic in four Phase 3 clinical trials for the treatment of
thrombotic-related disorders; rNAPc2, an anticoagulant that inhibits the
factor VIIa and tissue factor protease complex which recently completed
Phase 2 clinical development in acute coronary syndromes; and preclinical
candidate NU172, a direct thrombin inhibitor for use as a short-acting
anticoagulant during medical procedures. Nuvelo is also advancing an
emerging oncology pipeline, which includes NU206 for the potential
treatment of chemotherapy/radiation therapy- induced mucositis, as well as
rNAPc2 for potential use as a cancer therapy. In addition, Nuvelo expects
to leverage its expertise in secreted proteins and cancer antibody
discovery to further expand its pipeline and create additional partnering
and licensing opportunities.


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Biotech
Biotech

Proposed biotech park could transform city

Proposed biotech park could transform city - News

Proposed biotech park could transform city
Craig Grau
Issue date: 8/7/06 Section: News

The Quincie Douglas pool is located directly across from the site of the proposed UA Bioscience Park, East 36th Street and South Kino Parkway. Bioscience Park would place the UA at the forefront of the biotech technology.


The UA and Tucson's intellectual and economic identities are slated for big changes if city council members and developers can reconcile over details of a proposed 309-acre UA biotechnology park near South Tucson.

...

"Biotech is going to be to the 21st century what microelectronics were to the second half of the 20th century," Wright said. "It's going to be the leading-edge technology that will help to drive the U.S. and world economies."

The biotechnology park could catapult the UA to the front of the world's fastest-growing research industries during the next two decades, but the plan is in danger as developers and city officials continue to disagree over proposed land-swaps and building plans.

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