Sunday, February 26, 2006

Biotech News - Ellipsis Biotherapeutics Completes Four Contracts for High ThroughPut Genotyping

Ellipsis Biotherapeutics Completes Four Contracts for High Through-
Put Genotyping Services

DNAPrint Genomics, Inc. (OTCBB:DNAG) today announced that Ellipsis
Biotherapeutics, Inc. will complete a record quarter of revenue
generation from high volume SNP genotyping. A significant portion of
the revenue came from four contracts, including a major American
university, two United Kingdom academic research groups, and one
Toronto based academic hospital program. Ellipsis, acquired by the
Company in November 2005, conducts SNP genotyping using state-of-the-
art technologies. These include single-base primer extension
platforms from Beckman Coulter, Inc. and the GoldenGate(tm) platform
from Illumina, Inc. With a choice of platforms and scales for
performing work, Ellipsis supports companies through the entire
scope of their genotyping efforts. Projects include both high
throughput screening of multiple samples as well as finer mapping to
clarify associations of genetic predisposition in a variety of human
diseases.


"Our goal is to deliver the highest quality SNP genotyping services
to the marketplace, including project development, ongoing
scientific advice and data analysis and interpretation," commented
Dr. Laurence Rubin, founder of Ellipsis. "Ellipsis has completed
these projects on schedule and within budget. Our services have been
instrumental in helping scientists publish their work in respected
scientific journals. In addition to completing large volume contract
services for a variety of projects, we are participating in novel
research programs, which has always been part of the company's
focus," he added.

"We are extremely pleased that Ellipsis Biotherapeutics has met its
first major milestone and has done it with better than budgeted
goals and objectives. We expect that Ellipsis will continue to
contribute to our revenue growth and assist our core pursuit of
pharmaceuticals and diagnostics," said Richard Gabriel, Chief
Executive Officer and President of DNAPrint Genomics, Inc.

For further information on genotyping and other DNA services, please
contact Ellipsis Biotherapeutics at (416) 586-0947.

About DNAPrint Genomics, Inc.

DNAPrint Genomics, Inc. (www.dnaprint.com) is a developer of
genomics-based products and services in two primary markets:
biomedical and forensics. DNAPrint Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a wholly
owned subsidiary, develops diagnostic tests and theranostic products
(drug/test combinations) using the Company's proprietary ancestry-
informed genetic marker studies combined with proprietary
computational modeling technology. Computational Biology and
Pharmacogenomics services are also offered externally to
biopharmaceutical companies. The Company's first theranostic product
is PT-401, a "Super EPO" (erythropoietin) dimer protein drug for
treatment of anemia in renal dialysis patients (end stage renal
disease). Pre-clinical and clinical development of all the Company's
drug candidates will benefit from simulated pre-trials to better
design actual trials and are targeted to patients with a genetic
profile indicating their propensity to have the best clinical
response. DNAPrint is proud of its continued dedication to
developing and supplying new technological advances in law
enforcement and consumer ancestry heritage interests. Please refer
to www.dnaprint.com for information on law enforcement and consumer
applications which include DNAWITNESS(tm), RETINOME(tm),
ANCESTRYbyDNA(tm) and EURO-DNA(tm). DNAWitness-Y and DNAWitness-Mito
are two tests offered by the Company for additional forensics work.
The results from these tests may be used as identification tools
when a DNA sample is deteriorated or compromised or other DNA
testing fails to yield acceptable results. The Company also performs
contract genotyping and other DNA services through its Ellipsis
Biotherapeutics group in Toronto, Canada.

Forward-Looking Statements

All statements in this press release that are not historical are
forward-looking statements. Such statements are subject to risks and
uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially
from those projected, including, but not limited to, uncertainties
relating to technologies, product development, manufacturing, market
acceptance, cost and pricing of DNAPrint's products, dependence on
collaborations and partners, regulatory approvals, competition,
intellectual property of others, and patent protection and
litigation. DNAPrint Genomics, Inc. expressly disclaims any
obligation or undertaking, except as may be required by applicable
law or regulation, to release publicly any updates or revisions to
any forward-looking statements contained herein to reflect any
change in DNAPrint's expectations with regard thereto or any change
in events, conditions, or circumstances on which any such statements
are based.

CONTACT: DNAPrint Genomics, Inc.
Richard Gabriel, CEO and President
(941)366-3400

The Wall Street Group, Inc.
Ron Stabiner
(212) 888-4848

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Biotech News - Leading Expert in Medical Manufacturing Startups Leads Medical Devices

Leading Expert in Medical Manufacturing Startups Leads Medical
Devices & Technology Initiative


Christophe J-P Sevrain of Bloomfield Hills to Spearhead Saginaw
Valley Project

SAGINAW, Mich., Feb. 24 Christophe J-P Sevrain, former
head of Delphi Medical Systems, has been contracted to help mid-
Michigan take the lead in expanding the state's medical device
manufacturing industry.

Sevrain, owner of CJPS Enterprises, a consulting management firm
focused on creating strategic alliances and generating high growth
for its clients, will work with Saginaw Future Inc. to begin a hands-
on implementation of the economic development organization's Medical
Devices & Technology Initiative.

The effort will help attract, retain and assist in the expansion of
life science industries, medical device and diagnostic firms and
medical service providers in mid-Michigan.

The work, Sevrain says, will help the state grow its life
sciences industry, already one of Michigan's fastest-growing sectors.
"Pharmaceuticals, medical devices, instrumentation, diagnostics and
biotech research are growing faster in Michigan than in any other
state," he says.

"The Saginaw Valley's role will help keep that momentum going."

A native of France, Sevrain was managing director for the
startup of
Delphi Medical Systems, overseeing its growth from nine employees
and no
revenue to 400 employees generating nine-figure revenue bookings, in
just 18
months. Before that he was vice president for global technology for
the IV
Systems and Medical Products division of Baxter International, one
of the
world's largest makers of medical devices.
As a consultant and a company executive, he has been involved in
a number
of medical device manufacturing startups, and holds many patents for
his own
medical technology innovations.
Like many other Michigan cities, the Saginaw area has
historically had a
strong presence in the automotive industry -- and has lost many auto
manufacturing jobs over the last three decades. That auto
experience, Sevrain
says, is a plus for mid-Michigan -- and the state.
"I see much potential and opportunity for this initiative," says
Sevrain.
"The Saginaw region understands advanced manufacturing and has a
highly-
skilled workforce in place, which are key advantages to
transitioning into
medical manufacturing."
SFI President JoAnn Crary says Sevrain's addition is a great
opportunity.
"Mr. Sevrain is an agent of change with extensive experience in
startup
companies, which is what we will be creating with this initiative."
Crary says Sevrain was chosen for his proven expertise in the
medical
device manufacturing arena.
"A lot of people and resources have come together in order to
lay the
foundation for this regional medical initiative," said Dr. Samuel
Shaheen,
initiative chairman. "This is an amazing opportunity for the
economy and
growth of not only the Tri-Counties, but also the State of Michigan."
Sevrain's relationship with SFI was announced at a news
conference Friday
at the HORIZONS Conference Center in Saginaw, and was followed
immediately by
SFI's 14th Annual Business Meeting. At the meeting, SFI officials
presented
the results of the initiative's strategic report, finalized last
month.

Formed in 1992, Saginaw Future Inc. is a public-private
partnership of
business, government, labor and education. Saginaw Future has
agreements in
place to provide economic development services for the city of
Saginaw, county
of Saginaw and 15 local municipalities. Over 157 private businesses
and
individuals, along with 11 foundations and organizations, also
provide
contributions to the 501(c)3 economic development organization. For
more
information, visit us online at http://saginawfuture.com .

About CJPS Enterprises: CJPS Enterprises offers entrepreneurial
leadership
to companies in need of explosive growth. An international
perspective,
general management experience, expertise in fast product development,
licensing and business development enable Sevrain to make an impact
quickly.
His approach is to accelerate growth with a surgical efficiency that
is both
productive and profitable. He is a creator of new products,
processes and
businesses in medical and electronics markets. He is experienced in
raising
working capital through strategic alliances, spin-offs of business
units and
equity investments.

For more information, please contact:
JoAnn Crary, President
(989) 754-8222 x 235
jcrary@saginawfuture.com

SOURCE Saginaw Future Inc.
Web Site: http://saginawfuture.com

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Biotech News - Last Chance to Attend the '5th Annual North America Biotech Forum

Last Chance to Attend the '5th Annual North America Forum for
Investing and Partnering in Biotech & Medtech' Hosted by Sachs
Associates

Sachs Associates announced the final programme for the "5th Annual
North America Forum for Investing and Partnering in Biotech &
Medtech", taking place on March 13 - 14, 2006, at the Fairmont
Copley Plaza in Boston.

This two day forum is designed for leading investors and VC's to
hear presentations from an exciting cross-section of venture-funded
and small-cap companies, all of whom are seeking strategic
partnerships, acquisitions or funding.


The programme features individual presentations from over 60 pre IPO
and small cap listed companies as well as a panel debate and a
keynote opening presentation from leading authorities including
Jonathan Leff, Warburg Pincus, Dennis Purcell, Aisling Capital, Stan
Yakatan, Katan Associates, Dr. O. Prem Das, Harvard Medical School
and Anthony Hoerning, Novartis Pharmaceuticals.

"This Forum is an opportunity to hear from the most promising mid -
late stage biotech companies looking to reinforce their position in
this exciting market", said Leonard Sachs, Managing Director of
Sachs Associates.

Hosted at the Fairmont Copley Plaza in Boston, the venue allows
delegates to set up meetings in private meeting facilities with
potential clients through access to the Sachs Associates online one-
on-one meeting system.

Places are strictly limited, but Sachs Associates still have a few
complimentary places open to qualified institutional investors. To
apply for a complimentary place please contact
registrations@sachsforum.com

For further programme details please visit www.sachsforum.com.

Contact Sachs Associates Ltd Head of Conferences Hannah-Louise
Stewart, +44 (0)20 7405 5544 hl @ sachsforum.com

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Biotech News - Eighteen High Schools Pilot National Biotech Course

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Eighteen High Schools Pilot National Biotech Course

Indiana schools among 18 pilot sites for National Biotech Course, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Professor writes curriculum and trains teachers with state funding.

Newswise — Indiana high school teacher Chris Montgomery's class gave a harmless strain of E. coli bacteria a green glow by genetically engineering the bacteria using the bioluminescent gene from a jelly fish.

Then the class simulated the mass production of insulin using purified E. coli.

Now the Brownsburg High School students have turned their engineering minds to alternative fuels. Their new assignment: design a car powered by yeast fermentation.

Brownsburg High is one of six Indiana high schools piloting a new course soon to be offered across the United States through a program aimed at helping schools develop new generations of engineers.

The course, Biotechnical Engineering, focuses on two areas: biotechnology or the use of biological processes as tools to create commercial products such as new drugs; and biomedical engineering, the application of engineering principles to human health care, such as used in the design of pacemakers or joint implants.

"It's broadened the horizon of a lot of kids," Montgomery said of the class. "It's really a great opportunity for kids to have some hands-on, real-work experience in high school. This affords them lots of opportunities to get their feet wet in the career . . . to feel out the biotechnology careers.

A biomedical engineering professor from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, a biology professor from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind., and two high school teachers designed the course content.

The Indiana Department of Education funded the development of the course in partnership with Project Lead the Way. Biotechnical Engineering will be taught as an advanced high school unit of the Project Lead the Way curriculum currently offered in 1,000 high school schools nationwide.

Project Lead the Way is a national nonprofit organization that provides pre-engineering curricula, software and teacher training for middle and high schools. The goal is to address the nation's need for an expanding supply of engineering professionals by interesting students in those career fields at an earlier age.

Currently Project Lead the Way's high school curriculum includes six units: Principles of Engineering; Introduction to Engineering Design; Digital Electronics; Computer Integrated Manufacturing; Civil Engineering and Architecture; and Engineering Design and Development. An aerospace engineering course is also under development.

"Biotechnical Engineering will roll out nationwide next fall," said Dave Wilkinson, Project Lead the Way coordinator for the Indiana Department of Education. The need for and interest in the course are obvious, he said.

"There is not a day that goes by, when the words `biomedical' or `biotechnical' don't appear in the news," Wilkinson said. "The demand to get students in the pipeline for the future is critical."

Project Lead the Way's high school program and four-unit middle program adhere to national standards and math, science and technology. In Indiana, 135 middle and high schools, representing about 14,000 students, participate in the pre-engineering program. IUPUI and other universities offer college credit to students who complete high school Project Lead the Way courses.

"It is a really unique national program," said Ed Berbari, IUPUI professor and chair of biomedical engineering; and one of the lead developers of the Biotechnical Engineering course. "Project Lead the Way has a very professional approach to course development."

Eighteen sites are participating in the biotechnical engineering pilot course, including five other Indiana schools: Gavit High School in Hammond; Greenfield High School; Hamilton Southeastern High School; Owen Valley High in Spencer; and South Newton in Kentland.

Berbari also developed and conducted the teacher training required of those teaching the pilot course. Any Project Lead the Way course is taught by a teacher specifically trained for that course.

"It was a very intensive boot camp," Montgomery said of her two-week, 8-to-5 training program that included homework each evening.

Biotech News - Cutting-Edge Science, Potential Disease Treatments on Display at BIO 2006

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Cutting-Edge Science, Potential Disease Treatments on Display at BIO 2006 Business Forum


WASHINGTON, Feb. 24 The BIO 2006 Business Forum will feature biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies working to develop therapies for some of the world's most devastating diseases and illnesses including many forms of cancer, diabetes and genetic disorders. The Business Forum runs April 9-12 at the McCormick Center in Chicago. It is a major part of the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) 2006 Annual International Convention.

In addition to providing a venue for biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to present cutting-edge science, the Business Forum offers companies the chance to network and meet one-on-one with academic research institutions and investors representing countries across the globe. The aim is to bring the business, financial and research communities together to discuss partnering, licensing and other opportunities.

"Historically, the Business Forum has been one of the most successful events at BIO's Annual International Convention, generally drawing upwards of 3,000 registrants," said Morrie Ruffin, BIO's executive vice president of business development and capital formation.

"Last year, 954 companies participated in the partnering program and BIO scheduled 7,504 partnering meetings," Ruffin said. "This year we expect greater success."

Profiles of presenting companies and those participating in partnering meetings will be available at the Business Forum and online in the Company Profile section of the conference website. In addition, a complete schedule of company presentations will be available on this site at the Business Forum.


BIO represents more than 1,100 biotechnology companies, academic institutions, state biotechnology centers and related organizations across the United States and 31 other nations. BIO members are involved in the research and development of healthcare, agricultural, industrial and environmental biotechnology products.

Biotech News

Arizona Biotech

Biotech News - $100 million bioscience grant for Arizona

Big chips are falling into place for Arizona

Big chips are falling into place for Arizona

Arizona's budding bioscience sector includes the Translational Genomics Research Institute in Phoenix and biotech initiatives at all three state universities and a dozen hospitals. As bioscientists expand our knowledge of how genes work, medicine will become more individualized. Instead of using a shotgun approach to fighting cancer, for instance, a doctor will be able to match drugs to the specific genetic makeup of an individual's tumor.Researchers at TGen are using genetics to find treatments for autism, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and Type II diabetes. And Arizonans will be the first to benefit from cutting-edge drugs and medical devices that are developed here. That's because test subjects for promising new treatments are typically drawn from local residents, who can be easily monitored. As Arizona's research muscle grows, the state can attract top-flight scientists, raising the potential for achievement. As research breakthroughs are turned into products, there are increasing prospects for new investment and entrepreneurs. The economic potential is so exciting that business leaders from the Valley, Tucson and Flagstaff are setting up a new non-profit, Science Foundation Arizona. They're committing $2.5 million a year to operate the foundation, which will help implement a state bioscience "road map."

Biotech News Biotech News

Opinion by Richard Ducote : Legislature brightening state's future in bioscience | www.azstarnet.com �

Opinion by Richard Ducote : Legislature brightening state's future in bioscience

The state is on the verge of committing serious money to help boost our standing in the field of bioscience.
The aptly named Arizona 21st Century Competitive Initiative Fund has drawn a $100 million matching commitment from the private Stardust Charitable Group. Finally, the state can compete on the same court with serious research centers nationally.
Science Foundation Arizona has been established to help coordinate and prioritize funding for the resources we have or are developing.

Biotech News Biotech News

biotech grant

$100M biotech grant raises Valley donor’s profile
By Ed Taylor, Tribune

February 26, 2006

Jerry Bisgrove isn’t a guy who likes to make a big splash. Although the chairman and founder of the Stardust Cos. is well known in business and philanthropic circles, he has kept a relatively low public profile.

That’s likely to change now that he has agreed to commit a hefty $100 million though his Stardust Charities Group to the biosciences in Arizona.

The $100 million pledge to the Science Foundation Arizona is the largest private donation to the biotech sector in Arizona’s history, and it’s also the biggest single commitment ever made by Stardust. Since it’s founding in 1992, the group has contributed about $60 million to charitable causes including affordable housing, health care and education.

East Valley Tribune | Daily Arizona news for Chandler, Gilbert, Tempe, Mesa, Scottsdale

Biotech News

Tuesday, February 21, 2006

Biotech News - UC San Diego Partners with Venter Institute to Build

UC San Diego Partners with Venter Institute to Build
Community Cyberinfrastructure for Advanced Marine
Microbial Ecology Research and Analysis
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Awards

$24.5 Million Grant to Advance Metagenomics Research

By Doug Ramsey


Larry Smarr, Director, Calit2 and Principal Investigator, CAMERA
Researchers at UCSD will build a state-of-the-art computational
resource and develop software tools to decipher the genetic code of
communities of microbial life in the world's oceans. The new
resource will help scientists understand how microbes function in
their natural ecosystems, enable studies on the effect humans are
having on the environment, as well as permit insight into the
evolution of life on Earth. The UCSD Division of the California
Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2)
will lead the project in partnership with J. Craig Venter Institute
(Venter Institute) in Rockville, MD, and UCSD's Center for Earth
Observations and Applications (CEOA) at Scripps Institution of
Oceanography.

"This prototype cyberinfrastructure will be used by scientists
studying marine life and ecosystems to examine—in an unprecedented
manner—the genomic complexities of natural communities of micro-
organisms as they have evolved in their local environments," said
UCSD Chancellor Marye Anne Fox. "This project will change the way
large-scale science can be conducted and we are proud to develop
this world-class and pioneering facility on our UCSD campus."


Sorcerer II circumnavigation route

The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation has awarded $24.5 million over
seven years to create the Community Cyberinfrastructure for Advanced
Marine Microbial Ecology Research and Analysis (CAMERA). Scientists
will use CAMERA for metagenomics research—analyzing microbial
genomic sequence data in the context of other microbial species, as
well as in comparison to a variety of other "metadata" such as the
chemical and physical conditions in which microbes are sampled.


Craig Venter (left) sampling in Sargasso Sea with Tony Knapp,
director of Bermuda Biological Station for Research
"The explosion of data from the collection and sequencing of marine
microbes requires a completely novel approach to storing, accessing,
mining, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from this rich new wealth
of information," said co-investigator J. Craig Venter, Ph.D.,
president of Venter Institute. "The goal is to create a community
resource to house all metagenomic data that will facilitate and
advance knowledge of marine microbial ecology, other natural
environments, and evolutionary biology."

The CAMERA project builds on pioneering efforts in metagenomics to
sequence the genomes of entire microbial communities, often
comprising thousands of species. The largest such effort is Venter
Institute's Sorcerer II Expedition, for which sequencing is funded
by the Moore Foundation. The Expedition is developing the first
large-scale genomic survey of microbial life in the world's oceans
to produce the largest gene catalogue ever assembled. Sorcerer II is
expected to more than double the number of protein sequences
currently available in the National Institutes of Health's GenBank.
The metagenomics database will include new sequences, genes and gene
families, together with their annotations and associated
environmental metadata.


Slide with bacteria from Venter Institute's Sorcerer II Expedition
The move from traditional organism genome databases to the CAMERA-
based environmental metagenomics data storage and computational
complex requires development of a more complex cyber-architecture.
Using dedicated optical circuits, CAMERA will permit scientists to
connect their local laboratory PC clusters directly to the CAMERA
database and tools using the National LambdaRail or international
optical circuits, resulting in up to a hundred-fold increase in
bandwidth over current standards.

The enhanced connectivity is based on a model pioneered by the
OptIPuter project and funded by the National Science
Foundation. "Linking Venter Institute to Calit2 will be the first
persistent application of the OptIPuter high-
performance `collaboratory'," said Calit2 director Larry Smarr,
Ph.D., principal investigator on both the OptIPuter and CAMERA
projects. "The architecture is quite general and will be quickly
adaptable to other areas of data-intensive science." Collaboratories
are virtual laboratories where scientists can collaborate on
research from dispersed locations—interacting with colleagues,
accessing instrumentation, sharing data and computational resources,
and accessing information from remote digital libraries.

Calit2 will also partner with UCSD's San Diego Supercomputer Center
(SDSC) to create a next-generation science data server complex,
which couples the Calit2 and SDSC middleware, compute, and storage
capabilities with the NSF's TeraGrid distributed, high- performance
computing facility in a unified Service Oriented Architecture.
SDSC's Philip Papadopoulos noted that, "the CAMERA complex will have
a thousand processors of dedicated local cluster computing and
several hundred terabytes of replicated data storage, backed up by
the SDSC and TeraGrid high performance compute and storage
complexes." This will enable "scalable computing" resources to be
applied to a wide range of computational tools to tackle the
computationally intense questions derived from the larger
metagenomic data collection.

Calit2 and Venter Institute will also support a series of training
sessions and specialized seminars on this emerging discipline, as
well as provide space for environmental metagenomics visitors to
collaborate with CAMERA specialists. Over the next few years, CAMERA
is expected to include other environmental or medical metagenomic
datasets, as the novel cyberinfrastructure enables research in other
disciplines.

The Moore Foundation grant, in part, contributes to the $1 billion
fundraising goal of The Campaign for UCSD: Imagine What's Next.

Media Contacts:

Doug Ramsey, Calit2, (858) 822-5825
Melanie Wranaker, Venter Institute, (301) 943-8879
Mario Aguilera or Cindy Clark, Scripps/CEOA, (858) 534-3624
Ashley Wood, SDSC, (858) 534-8363
Alex Barnum, Moore Foundation, (415) 561-7414
Debra Kain, UCSD Health Sciences, (619) 543-6163

Background

The goal of the CAMERA project is to create important advances in
the knowledge of evolutionary biology and microbial ecology in
marine and other natural environments.

"Metagenomics has the potential to revolutionize our understanding
of microbial ecology in a large number of environments," said David
Kingsbury, Ph.D., chief program officer for science at the Moore
Foundation. "The major factor limiting its further progress has been
the management of the very large quantities of data. We are
delighted to be able to support the development of this community
resource at one of the world's premier sites for high-speed
networking and high-performance scientific computing."

In addition to Sorcerer II's ecological genomic data, the CAMERA
database will be augmented by the soon-to-be-completed genomes of
more than 150 critical marine microbes, also funded by the Moore
Foundation, for comparative genomics studies. Venter Institute's
Marv Frazier, Ph.D., co-principal investigator with Larry Smarr,
said "We are looking forward to providing a metagenomics server
complex for the data produced by our colleagues at the Department of
Energy's Joint Genome Institute."

Scripps researchers will contribute expertise in modeling, analysis
and information management across Earth-science observing
systems. "We also have a set of world-class researchers in microbial
ecology and annotating marine genomic data," said Scripps Deputy
Director John Orcutt, who directs the CEOA and is a co-investigator
on the new project along with Terry Gaasterland, director of the
Scripps Genome Center launched last October. Experts at Venter
Institute and the Scripps Genome Center will create annotations for
much of the CAMERA genomic data.

The project brings together new technologies of high-throughput DNA
sequencing and metagenomic analysis tools on the one hand, and
cyberinfrastructure innovations on the other. Together, they will
provide new tools to help marine microbial ecologists access and
derive inferences from the massive data sets. The tools will allow
ecologists, for example, to analyze families of proteins and conduct
comparative analyses across multiple genomes.

"Each individual sequence is no longer just a piece of a genome. It
is part of an entire biological community," said Peter Arzberger,
Ph.D., director of the NIH-funded National Biomedical Computation
Resources (NBCR), and lead author of the CAMERA grant
proposal. "CAMERA will build on the NBCR software tools and user
portal to explore the metagenomics data."

NBCR has links to the UCSD School of Medicine, and co-investigator
John Wooley is affiliated with the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and
Pharmaceutical Sciences. "Along with providing a novel approach to
advancing fundamental biological knowledge, analysis of the marine
genome data will allow us insight into natural marine products and
how they can be applied for pharmacy and medicine," said Wooley, the
university's Associate Vice Chancellor for Research. "The new
resource will greatly enhance our health science researchers'
ability to advance the development of new drugs and therapies from
the ocean's resources to combat cancer and neurodegenerative and
other diseases."

Venter Institute will make available a large collection of community-
developed genome analysis software tools. The CAMERA tools will
address the needs of two groups of users. The first group comprises
potential users with little programming ability using web-based
tools to explore data and visualization tools to interpret the
results. The second group comprises bioinformatics experts with
their own tools and programming. CAMERA will encourage this later
group to contribute their software analysis tools, thus engaging the
broader community in strengthening this international resource.

Other co-investigators on the CAMERA project include Venter
Institute's Saul Kravitz, Aaron Halpern and Jonathan Eisen, as well
as UCSD-based scientists Tom DeFanti and Ingolf Krueger.

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Monday, February 20, 2006

Biotech News - DOL grant will boost state's "innovation corridor"

A state region that includes Santa Clara, Santa Cruz and Monterey
counties has received a $15 million, three-year grant from the U.S.
Department of Labor to develop an economic plan encompassing
entrepreneurship, manufacturing supply chains and worker training.

The grant is designed to encourage public-private partnerships to
address local economic challenges, said Loree Levy, a spokesperson for
the state of California Employment Development Department.

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Biotech News - Rubicon Genomics Forms New Scientific Advisory Board to Reflect Its Developments

Rubicon Genomics Forms New Scientific Advisory Board to Reflect Its
Developments in Molecular Diagnostics


Dr. Arul M. Chinnaiyan Appointed First Advisory Board Member

Rubicon Genomics today announced the formation of a new Scientific
Advisory Board to support its recent advances in cancer molecular
diagnostics.

The company appointed Arul M. Chinnaiyan, M.D., Ph.D. as its first
new Molecular Diagnostics Scientific Advisory Board Member. Dr.
Chinnaiyan is the S.P. Hicks Endowed Professor of Pathology and
Associate Professor of Urology at the University of Michigan Medical
School. He is the co-Director of the Division of Pathology
Informatics and Director of the Cancer Bioinformatics Core. He is a
recognized leader in the field and has led the characterization
of a number of biomarkers of prostate cancer including AMACR, EZH2,
and hepsin. Most recently, his laboratory identified gene fusion of
TMPRSS2 to ETS family of transcription factors in prostate cancer,
potentially redefining the molecular basis of prostate cancer as
well as other common epithelial cancers. Dr. Chinnaiyan has
received numerous awards, authored more than 100 publications, holds
several U.S. patents, and is funded by the National Institute of
Health, the American Cancer Society, and the Department of
Defense.

"We feel both privileged and fortunate to have Dr. Chinnaiyan
joining our New Scientific Advisory Board for Molecular
Diagnostics," said Fred G. Beyerlein, President & CEO of
Rubicon. "Our association with Dr. Chinnaiyan, his labs, and the
University of Michigan spans several years and has proven to
be a fruitful collaboration. Our mutual interests in developing
breakthroughs in the early detection, monitoring, and deeper
understanding of cancer have always been in alignment. We are
looking forward to his insights and contributions as a member of our
newly formed Molecular Diagnostics Scientific Advisory Board."

About Rubicon Genomics, Inc.
Rubicon, located in Ann Arbor, MI, is focused on the development of
highly sensitive and highly specific non-invasive tests for cancer
and other diseases using its proprietary MethylPlex(TM) technology.
Utilizing the MethylPlex platform the company has discovered and
developed proprietary tumor markers and patterns of tumor markers.
The Company is a leader in the development of breakthrough methods
of detecting the pattern of genetic, epigenetic, and expression
changes in tumor cells as well as developing kits and services to
facilitate gene-based research and drug development. For additional
information please visit the Rubicon website:
http://rubicongenomics.com or
telephone 734-677-6210.

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Biotech News - MichBio Announces Annual Meeting on March 8, 2006

MichBio Announces Annual Meeting on March 8, 2006


Keynote- Kenneth J. Matzick, president and chief executive
officer
of Beaumont Hospitals

MichBio, the non-profit
organization dedicated to driving the growth of the life sciences
industry in
Michigan, will host Kenneth J. Matzick, president and CEO of the
Beaumont
Hospitals, as the keynote speaker for the March 8 meeting at the
Eagle Crest
Conference Center in Ypsilanti, Mich. The annual meeting is held at
the
beginning of each year and includes dinner, a keynote speaker, open
bar, live
music and board elections.
"We are pleased to host Mr. Matzick at our annual meeting.
Beaumont's
research institute is in full swing with 700 active studies and Mr.
Matzick
will have a great deal to share with our members," noted Dr. Michael
Witt,
executive director of MichBio. MichBio members will vote for new
Board members
as part of the meeting. Dr. Witt will announce the new Board and
submit an
executive director's report.
Beaumont Hospital has grown from a single 238-bed hospital
opened in 1955
to serve a small community in Royal Oak, Michigan, into a two-
hospital
regional medical center. In 1977, Beaumont expanded into Troy with
what is now
a 254-bed community and teaching hospital that is ranked among the
nation's
busiest smaller community hospitals. The original Beaumont Hospital,
Royal Oak
facility has evolved into a 1,061-bed tertiary care, teaching,
research and
referral hospital that is the largest inpatient hospital in the
country.
Today, their medical staff includes more than 2,400 physicians
representing
more than 91 medical and surgical specialties.
Kenneth Matzick became Beaumont's CEO in April 2005, after
having served
as the organization's executive vice president and COO since 1997.
He is a
member of Beaumont's Board of Directors and the Beaumont Foundation
Board of
Directors, and he serves on the Board of Governors of the Beaumont
Research
Institute. Mr. Matzick is currently a member of the Board of
Directors of the
Greater Detroit Area Health Council, the MI Health and Hospital
Association
and the University of Iowa HMP Alumni Board.
The MichBio Annual Meeting draws 125 to 150 of the industry's
leaders and
most influential biotech professionals from across the state of
Michigan.
Registration and networking begin an open bar at 5:30 p.m., followed
by dinner
and presentation at 6:30 p.m. The cost is $75.00 for members and
$100 for non-
members. For more information and to register, please visit
http://www.michbio.org/events .

About MichBio
MichBio is a non-profit organization dedicated to driving the
growth of
the life sciences industry in Michigan. The association serves a
diverse
membership, including new and established life sciences companies,
academic
and research institutions, as well as service providers and related
organizations throughout the state.
Acting as a focal point for the life sciences community, MichBio
provides
networking and educational events, offers a web portal to industry-
specific
state and national information, addresses public policy, and is
focusing on
the human resource, funding and infrastructure issues affecting
Michigan's
biosciences industry.

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Biotech News - Biotech eyes RTP location - United Therapeutics

Biotech News - Biotech eyes RTP location


Biotech eyes RTP location

Amanda Jones

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK - North Carolina lost the battle to Maryland last year for United Therapeutics' $32 million lab facility, but the woman-led biotechnology company is looking at the Triangle again for a $50 million project.



United, which is based in Silver Spring, Md., wants to build a 200,000-square-foot manufacturing and laboratory building in Research Triangle Park that could employ as many as 300 workers.



Roger Jeffs, United's president and chief operating officer, says the company's current focus is on building sites in RTP, and United has been working with state, Wake County and RTP economic developers for a suitable location. "We hope to finalize the decision on the selection of an appropriate site in the coming months," says Jeffs, who is based in RTP. United Chairwoman and CEO Martine Rothblatt works out of the firm's Maryland office.



Jeffs hinted that the company is looking at some other sites outside of RTP. He said the facility will manufacture and package the oral tablet form of the company's lead drug, Remodulin. The research and development group and related sales and marketing teams associated with the drug would be housed in the same facility. The tablet form of Remodulin has yet to be approved by the FDA.

Easing fears of biotech food

Easing fears of biotech food

Why industry opposes labels for genetically modified crops

By Jim Wasserman -- Bee Staff Writer
Published 2:15 am PST Monday, February 20, 2006
Story appeared in Business section, Page D1
Get weekday updates of Sacramento Bee headlines and breaking news. Sign up here.

Nineteen months ago Sean Darragh, a former U.S. defense, national security and trade official, became a leading promoter and new public face of the global agricultural biotechnology industry.
Representing more than 1,100 biotech companies, academic institutions and state research centers, Darragh travels the planet as head of food and agriculture for the Biotechnology Industry Organization in Washington, D.C.

As chief spokesman for a decade-old and still controversial technology used on 1 billion acres of farmland worldwide, Darragh tries to reassure a sometimes skeptical public that genetically modified food is both safe and good for the environment.

U.S. farmers grow mostly herbicide-resistant corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, squash and papaya on 123 million acres.


Biotech News

Biotech News - Biocomplexity - Scientists look to the Bahamas as a model

Scientists look to the Bahamas as a model for coral reef conservation

One of the greatest challenges facing marine ecologists today is
finding innovative ways to reverse the rapid decline of coral reef
ecosystems around the world. Ten percent of the planet's reefs
already have been degraded beyond recovery, according to one survey,
and another 60 percent could die by 2050, primarily because of human
activities, such as pollution, overfishing and climate change.
The situation is particularly acute in the island nations of the
Caribbean, which have seen an 80 percent decline in coral cover in
recent decades. To address this crisis, an international team of
researchers, in consultation with the government of the Bahamas,
launched the Bahamas Biocomplexity Project--an interdisciplinary
approach to ecosystem management that project leaders say could
serve as a model for coral reef conservation worldwide.

"The Bahamas Biocomplexity Project works across various disciplines
to understand the intricate scientific and socioeconomic factors
contributing to ecosystem changes," said project principal
investigator Dan Brumbaugh, senior conservation scientist at the
American Museum of Natural History's Center for Biodiversity and
Conservation.

"Under the rubric of 'biocomplexity,' our approach recognizes that
natural and human systems are inextricably linked, and that analyses
and solutions must therefore transcend traditional disciplinary
boundaries," he added.

On Feb. 20, Brumbaugh and Fiorenza Micheli, assistant professor of
biological sciences at Stanford University's Hopkins Marine Station,
moderated a symposium entitled "Coral Reef Ecosystems and People in
The Bahamas: Practical Applications of Biocomplexity Science" at the
annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of
Science in St. Louis. Panelists included educators, social
scientists and marine biologists, who provided a progress report on
how biocomplexity science, still in its infancy, is being applied to
the problem of coral reef ecosystem management in the Bahamas.

The Bahamas model

"In 2000, the Bahamas committed to setting up a network of new no-
take reserves," said Brumbaugh , who is also a visiting scientist
with the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's
Marine Protected Areas Science Institute. "Starting with the
declaration of five new reserves, the country initiated a process
that was intended to lead to a system of protected areas covering 20
percent of their marine environment."

He pointed out that in 2002, new marine parks were added to the
national park system, which is managed by the Bahamas National
Trust, a non-governmental organization.

"This policy setting, along with interest from Bahamian partners in
having more scientific input for their decision making, set the
stage for researchers to try to look at how to best design a network
of marine protected areas," he explained. "Marine protected areas
provide promising, though sometimes contentious, tools for the
conservation and recovery of coral reef ecosystems. Contributing to
the heat of these discussions is the fact that apart from the most
direct effects of reserves, we really don't have a very good
understanding for how these complex systems will perform over time."

The Bahamas Biocomplexity Project was designed to address the
problem by adopting a holistic approach to marine conservation, he
said. In addition to using scientific tools--such as satellite
imagery, underwater surveys and population genetics--project members
conduct ethnographic and economic surveys to assess local attitudes
toward conservation, as well as educational outreach to explain
their findings to local stakeholders and decision makers.

"Interdisciplinary collaboration across oceanography, population
genetics, community ecology, anthropology and economics is providing
new insights into the relevant scales of planning for biodiversity
conservation and fisheries sustainability," Brumbaugh said. "Only
now are we starting to see some of the emerging lessons."

Predators, prey and seaweed

The project's most widely publicized finding to date was a study
published in the Jan. 6 issue of the journal Science written by
Peter Mumbry of the University of Exeter in Britain and a large team
of collaborators, including Brumbaugh and Micheli. The study focused
on the Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park, which, like other Caribbean
coral reefs, was struck by a mysterious disease in 1983 that
virtually wiped out a species of sea urchin that feeds on algae. The
urchins had played a vital role in the reef ecosystem by controlling
the spread of seaweed.

Since coral larvae only grow on rocks or dead corals that are algae-
free, too much seaweed can prevent corals from re-establishing
damaged reefs in the aftermath of hurricanes and other deadly
events.

With the urchins gone, the job of chief seaweed grazer was taken
over by a colorful herbivore known as the parrotfish. Parrotfish, in
turn, are preyed upon by large carnivores, such as the Nassau
grouper, whose numbers had increased in the park since the
imposition of a fishing ban in 1986. Today, according to the Science
study, Nassau grouper is seven times more abundant inside the park
than in three comparable areas elsewhere in the Bahamas.

But did the grouper population explosion occur at the expense of the
parrotfish, and therefore to the benefit of algae? For parrotfish,
the answer depends on which species. Researchers found that small
species were smaller than usual inside the reserve, suggesting that
grouper predators were picking off the largest members of their
populations inside the park.

In contrast, the number of big parrotfish--species 10 inches or
longer, too large for a grouper to swallow--increased inside the
park, apparently in response to protection from fish traps. The
study concluded that seaweed grazing in Exuma had doubled because of
the burgeoning population of big parrotfish, resulting in a fourfold
reduction in algal abundance compared to areas outside the park.

"The Science results suggest that parks protecting fishes may also
have beneficial effects on corals, by enhancing grazing and thereby
contributing to the ability of reefs to bounce back from
disturbances." said project co-principal investigator Micheli. These
results highlight the inherent complexity of life on reefs, she
added.

"There is this idea of redundancy in ecological systems: You lose
one species, but another replaces its function," Micheli said. "In
the case of grazers, 90 percent of urchins in one system were
depleted, but their function was replaced by parrotfishes.
Unfortunately, when you look at these small communities in the
Bahamas, there may only be a couple of species that have
interchangeable functions. Too often the boundaries of reserves are
drawn without having all of the necessary details about species and
habitats. Right now we're looking at what combinations of habitats
you need to protect to maintain the full set of ecological
processes."

Coral villages

In his AAAS presentation, project co-principal investigator Stephen
Palumbi discussed the genetics of marine habitats from the point of
view of corals--tiny animals closely related to sea anemones that
are responsible for building the reef framework. "We're looking at
the organisms that make the reef, because without them, the
organisms that use the reef wouldn't have a home," said Palumbi,
professor of biological sciences at Stanford's Hopkins Marine
Station.

He and his colleagues focused on staghorn corals, which used to be
common throughout the Caribbean: "We asked, Where do baby corals
come from, and from how far away can a healthy reef seed the
recovery of a damaged reef?"

To answer these questions, the Palumbi team compared the DNA of
staghorn corals collected from nine reefs, some just a few miles
apart, others separated by about 600 miles of ocean. "We look for
where the genetic barriers are," he said. "That tells us where the
larval barriers are. Our results show that genetic family lines can
be quite distinct on reefs as close as two kilometers (1.2 miles),
so they're not co-mingling over short distances. All reefs in our
study more than 500 kilometers (300 miles) apart were genetically
distinct. Coral families thus seem to exist in local villages, with
little genetic exchange above the scale of 50-100 kilometers (30-60
miles)."

This finding led Palumbi to raise another question: "If you have a
reef damaged by hurricanes, dynamite or sedimentation, how quickly
would you expect it to reseed? The answer: perhaps in thousands of
years."

Some marine ecologists advocate restoring dying or damaged reefs,
but that approach is rarely cost-effective, he argued.

"You can collect sprigs of coral, grow them in an aquarium, then
return them to a reef, but transplanted corals are easily killed,"
Palumbi said. "Maybe 1,000 out of 10,000 sprigs will grow, but with
a growth rate of about one centimeter per year, it would take many
years to get big. It's expensive, and not particularly successful.
From a management standpoint, the genetics tell us that each island
has to husband its own coral garden."

Human dimensions

"Better understandings of the dynamics of coral re-establishment and
species interaction are crucial, but these are only parts of the
puzzle," said project co-principal investigator Kenny Broad,
assistant professor at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School
of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences.

"How reserves may affect the local human communities that rely on
these fishing grounds must also be considered," Broad told the AAAS
symposium. "Will fishers shift effort toward other fishing grounds
that may then suffer similar environmental consequences? Might they
switch to activities and fishing methods even more damaging to the
environment once their livelihoods are threatened? Given the lack of
enforcement that exists in many parts of the world, how can local
groups play a role in developing innovative approaches for managing
the resources that they rely upon most directly?"

Such questions are being addressed by social scientists working
within the Bahamas Biocomplexity Project, he noted: "Our results in
the Bahamas as elsewhere suggest that rigid top-down directives that
lack local support will not be effective in protecting or restoring
coral reef ecosystems."

Other presenters at the AAAS session were Richard Stoffle of the
University Arizona; Alan Hastings of the University of California-
Davis; and Karen St. Cyr of the Bahamas Ministry of Education, now
on sabbatical at the University of Massachusetts. Stoffle described
details of his work with communities in the central Bahamas and
their views about marine reserves. Hastings discussed general
theoretical guidelines for reserve network design, highlighting some
of their intrinsic complexities, and St. Cyr addressed integrating
marine research and scientific results into education.

Several presenters highlighted the need for flexibility and special
consideration of local context, including history, economics,
cultural values and opportunities for advancing ecosystem-based
management. For example, public education and involvement--through
the formal school system and community workshops, where locals share
their ecological knowledge and researchers share their understanding
of the sustainability of ecosystem services--may contribute to wider
acceptance of ecosystem-based management.

"The parks and marine reserves in the Bahamas are enormously
thoughtful and successful, but when you visit there it seems
natural, because so much of it is submerged," Palumbi said. "They
realize there is a special relationship between the people and the
sea. Tourism, which is about 60 percent of the gross national
product, is based on environmental protection. But the Bahamas isn't
unique. It's one of several countries, including St. Lucia, Curacao,
Australia and South Africa, which has established the goal of
setting aside 20 percent or more of its marine ecosystem. It's not
that these countries are so far ahead, it's just that the United
States is so far behind."

###
By Mark Shwartz

The Bahamas Biocomplexity Program is primarily supported by the
National Science Foundation and includes 11 collaborating
institutions: American Museum of Natural History, Bahamas Ministry
of Education, Bahamas National Trust, College of the Bahamas, Perry
Institute for Marine Science, Resources for the Future, Stanford
University, University of Arizona, University of California-Davis,
University of Exeter and University of Miami's Rosenstiel School.

COMMENT:
Daniel Brumbaugh, American Museum of Natural History, Center for
Biodiversity and Conservation: (831) 420-3963 or (831) 234-4378
(cell), brumba@amnh.org

Fiorenza Micheli, Stanford University Department of Biological
Sciences: (831) 655-6320, micheli@stanford.edu

Stephen Palumbi, Stanford University Department of Biological
Sciences: (831) 655-6210, spalumbi@stanford.edu

Kenny Broad, University of Miami, Rosenstiel School: (305) 421-4851,
kbroad@rsmas.miami.edu







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Friday, February 17, 2006

Biotech News - Chromosome Rearrangements Not As Random As Believed

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Chromosome Rearrangements Not As Random As Believed


A report in the Feb. 17 issue of Science by genetics researchers at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania analyzes genetic predisposition to the translocation t(11;22), a swapping of genetic material between chromosomes 11 and 22. They found an unexpectedly high frequency of new translocations in the DNA of sperm samples from healthy individuals. (For technical reasons, egg cells cannot be tested for translocations.)


Chromosome Rearrangements Not As Random As Believed -- Genetic Predisposition May Raise Risk of Rare Disabling Syndrome --

As the human genome gradually yields up its secrets, scientists are finding some genetic events, such as rearrangements in chromosomes, are less random than they had previously thought. Originating as structural weaknesses in unstable stretches of DNA, abnormal chromosomes may, rarely, result in a disabling genetic disease one or two generations later.


 
By and large, these translocations are not cause for alarm, because those men and their offspring are highly unlikely to be affected. Approximately one sperm in 100,000 has the rearrangement, so the chance of an affected sperm fertilizing an egg is exceedingly low. However, when that does occur, the child has a constitutional t(11;22) translocation - all of their cells carry the rearrangement. That child, in turn, while otherwise healthy, often has fertility problems as an adult. Further, if this adult does become a parent, his or her offspring may have an abnormal chromosomal composition and suffer a disabling multisystem disease.

The disorder, called supernumerary der(22) t(11;22) or Emanuel syndrome, results from the havoc caused by an extra chromosome composed of parts of chromosome 11 and chromosome 22. Like Down syndrome, it is a trisomy, a disease caused by an extra chromosome. Patients with the condition usually have mental deficiency, growth retardation, a heart defect, cleft or abnormal palate, and other symptoms.

Although the heart defects were often lethal in the past, advances in heart surgery are allowing children with Emanuel syndrome to survive longer. Parents with an affected child who want to have another child can now have prenatal testing done during a subsequent pregnancy.

The disease is rare; hundreds of cases are known worldwide. Many of those children and their families have been studied by Beverly S. Emanuel, Ph.D., chief of Human Genetics and Molecular Biology at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and a co-author of the study. At the request of a parent support group, the syndrome was recently named after Dr. Emanuel, who first described the disease in 1980 with her colleague Elaine Zackai, M.D., also of Children's Hospital.

"We are learning a lot more about how chromosomes behave, or misbehave, since the completion of the Human Genome Project," said Dr. Emanuel, who played a major role in mapping chromosome 22 for that program. "We already knew, of course, that every time someone makes gametes, that is, sperm or egg cells, there is a possibility of introducing DNA changes. In this study, we asked if some people make those changes at a higher frequency, and found that this appears to be the case."

The researchers found that at the site where the translocation would occur, 87 percent of 394 normal chromosome 11 samples examined had repetitive stretches enriched in the DNA bases adenine and thymine, 450 bases long, in an unstable configuration called a palindrome. The other 13 percent of the chromosomes had shorter palindromic adenine- and thymine-rich sequences. Surprising was the finding that newly arising t(11:22) translocations occurred with a frequency of approximately one in 100,000 sperm cells from healthy men with the longer palindromic sequences. In contrast, men with a shorter palindromic sequence had a lower frequency of translocations.

"Palindromes are unstable sequences of DNA, and are prone to protrude from the DNA double helix in fragile structures called hairpins and cruciforms," said Hiroki Kurahashi, M.D., Ph.D., corresponding author of the paper. "The hairpins and cruciforms are weak points where the DNA can break and rearrange with DNA from other chromosomes."

Chromosome 22 also has palindromic hairpins and cruciform structures, where breaks occur and DNA swaps places with DNA from chromosome 11. Unlike more random, rarer chromosome translocations, the rearrangement between chromosomes 11 and 22 tends to recur, which led the researchers to investigate their DNA breakpoints in detail.

"Disorders based on peculiarities of chromosome architecture can be classified as genomic disorders," said Dr. Emanuel. Unlike single-gene diseases such as cystic fibrosis or hemophilia that result from mutations in one gene, genomic diseases originate in the broader structure of the genome - the full complement of DNA sequences in sets of chromosomes.

Recent research by Drs. Emanuel, Kurahashi and colleagues have detected other palindromic repetitive DNA sequences at the breakpoints of other translocations, suggesting that these unstable structures may play a broader role in chromosome abnormalities beyond the t(11;22) rearrangement.

Dr. Kurahashi is now at the Institute for Comprehensive Medical Science of Fujita Health University, Fujita, Japan. A grant from the National Institutes of Health supported this study.

About The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals and pioneering major research initiatives, Children's Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country, ranking second in National Institutes of Health funding. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 430-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents. For more information, visit http://www.chop.edu.


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Arizona Biotech News - Southwest 2006: Transforming Research Visions

Arizona Biotech News - Southwest 2006: Transforming Visions into
Business Realities Comprehensive Bioindustry and Business Conference
in Tucson April 3 & 4

The third of a bi-annual series of conferences organized by the Bio-
Industry Organization of Southern Arizona (BIO-SA), will be held at
the DoubleTree Hotel in Tucson, Arizona on April 3 and 4.

BIO-SA announced that BioSouthwest 2006: Transforming Research
Visions into Business Realities Comprehensive Bioindustry and
Business Conference will be held in Tucson April 3 & 4

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BioSouthwest 2006, third of a bi-annual series of conferences
organized by the Bio-Industry Organization of Southern Arizona (BIO-
SA), will be held at the DoubleTree Hotel in Tucson, Arizona on
April 3 and 4.

This year's program is expected to better nurture the convergence of
science and business.

Business-track sessions are designed to provide young and maturing
bioscience companies with exposure to resources to help maximize
growth. Scientific sessions will offer current and future research
topics of the 21st century.

The program is available at www.bio-sa.org

Venture Capitalist G. Steven Burrill of Burrill & Company in San
Francisco will give the opening keynote.

The midday Plenary Address by Dr. Vicki Chandler, Director of the
BIO5 Institute, will provide a vision of multidisciplinary
biological research yielding tangible benefits. A goal of BIO5
(http://bio5.org/) is to link researchers and the private sector to
deliver benefits to the community. She is a distinguished Regents'
Professor and member of the National Academy of Sciences, a winner
of the NIH Director's Pioneer award and celebrated investigator of
the genetics of maize.

Dr. David Thorpe, BIO-SA Chair & BioSouthwest Project Manager,
said "We are excited about the excellent program and the
unprecedented networking opportunities this event will provide to
members of our local biotech cluster as well as to attendees we will
draw from outside the region. BIO-SA strives to help establish the
connections needed to translate research visions into business
realities for our community. We know that cohesive communities are
critical to vibrant high-tech economies, and our meeting will help
people to make connections between scientific and business
communities. BioSouthwest should help improve human lives by
enabling the transformation of scientific ideas into realities."

ABOUT BIO-SA:

The BioIndustry Organization of Southern Arizona (BIO-SA) is
committed to promoting bioindustry in the region through community
building and business enablement. The BIO-SA cluster works to ensure
that the ingredients required for further expansion of the area's
bioindustry sector are in place. The BIO-SA cluster is comprised of
members from large and small companies, higher education and
research institutions, and individuals interested in the development
of a strong bioindustry in Southern Arizona. See http://www.bio-
sa.org for additional information.

BioSouthwest 2006 and BIO-SA CONTACT:
David Thorpe, MD PhD
Chair, BIOSA
Dept. of Discovery Biology
Sanofi-Aventis Combinatorial Technologies Center
Telephone: (520) 544 - 5842
FAX: (520) 575 - 8283



Arizona Biotech News


Biotech News

Biotech News - Biotech Gold

Biotech Gold

by: Dean Kleckner, Chairman, Truth About Trade & Technology


Dean Kleckner

If the Winter Olympics were to award medals for anti-biotech
hysteria, the Europeans probably would sweep the gold, silver, and
bronze. And they wouldn't even need help from the French judge.

http://www.truthabouttrade.org/article.asp?id=R54

But this event features fool's gold--and perhaps finally the time
has come to watch it go the way of tug-of-war (which was eliminated
as an Olympic sport after 1920). That's because a momentous ruling
from the World Trade Organization may help make it obsolete.
According to press reports, a WTO dispute panel has determined that
the European Union was wrong to impose a moratorium on GM foods for
six years.



Arizona Biotech News


Biotech News

Arizona Biotech News - Non-profit aids bioscience

Arizona Biotech News - Non-profit aids bioscience
Bolstering research, attracting firms are goals

Kerry Fehr-Snyder
The Arizona Republic
Feb. 17, 2006 12:00 AM

Business leaders this week formed a non-profit corporation to boost
Arizona's bioscience industry and are trying to recruit an
internationally known leader to head the organization.

Science Foundation Arizona is being created to attract private and
public funding for biotech and biosciences, distribute the funds to
key research efforts and lure new companies.

Its precise projects have yet to be decided, but they could range
from recruiting a pharmaceutical operation to funding expansion of
the Translational Genomics Research Institute or the University of
Arizona College of Medicine in downtown Phoenix, one official said.

"We're in the final stages of examining what it would take to stand
on the shoulders of what exists now and be among the best in the
world," said Don Budinger, one of Science Foundation Arizona's
organizers and director of the Rodel Charitable Foundation of
Arizona.

The group's overall mission is "to build and strengthen medical,
scientific and engineering research programs and infrastructure in
the areas of greatest strategic value to Arizona's competitiveness
in the global bioscience economy," Budinger said. He helped lure
computer wafermaker Sumitomo, now called Sitix, to Phoenix in the
1990s.

Budinger was one of four men who filed papers with the state on
Wednesday to incorporate the science foundation as a 501c(3) non-
profit. The others were John Murphy of the Flinn Foundation, Tom
Browning of Greater Phoenix Leadership and Steven W. Lynn of Uni-
source Energy, parent company of Tucson Electric Power.

Science Foundation Arizona is modeled in part after Science
Foundation Ireland. The Ireland group is led by William Harris,
former director of the Biosphere 2 Center in Oracle, near Tucson.

Harris is reportedly Arizona's top choice to lead Science Foundation
Arizona, although he apparently is weighing several offers despite
the state's efforts to court him since early December. He is a
consultant for Arizona's bioscience efforts. His contract with
Science Foundation Ireland is set to expire at the end of March.

"Bill Harris is the man who led the effort to reform Ireland's
economy and would be a great asset to Arizona," Gov. Janet
Napolitano said through a spokeswoman.

More here:
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/business/articles/0217scifoundation.html



Arizona Biotech News


Biotech News

Arizona Biotech News - Gordon notes biotech progress

( Phoenix Mayor Phil Gordon State of the City Speech Notes Biotech
Progress )

State of the City: Gordon notes biotech progress, stumps for bonds
Chris Casacchia
The Business Journal

The University of Arizona will locate its Clinical Pharmacogenomics
Institute in downtown Phoenix next year, Mayor Phil Gordon said
Tuesday during his 2006 State of the City address at the Hyatt
Regency.

The Phoenix biomedical campus will house more than 50
pharmaceutical "scientists-in-training," who will work with
researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute, the
Mayor said.

Pharmacogenomics is the study of how a person's genetic inheritance
affects the body's response to drugs.

http://phoenix.bizjournals.com/phoenix/stories/2006/02/13/daily24.html?jst==b_ln_hl



Arizona Biotech News


Biotech News

Arizona Biotech News - ASU teams up with Mayo Clinic to fight cancer

Arizona Biotech News - ASU teams up with Mayo Clinic to fight cancer
By Emily Gersema, Tribune
February 17, 2006

A leading Scottsdale hospital and university researchers are
combining their brain power to fight cancer.

The Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University are forming a
partnership called "MAC-5," which combines the expertise of
scientists from both entities to make research discoveries and
improve cancer treatment, university officials announced Thursday.

Several ASU researchers from various fields, including engineering
and computer science, are taking part in the relationship. They will
work closely with Mayo Clinic physicians in Scottsdale to develop
ther- apies for patients and further study the disease in its
various forms.

George Poste leads ASU's Biodesign Institute, whose researchers are
involved in the partnership. Poste said he believes their efforts
could lead to health care tailored to each patient's unique needs —
a new level of care achieved with help from the institute's biotech
research. This is a growing area of study that applies discoveries
by scientists in various fields — from plant sciences to human
genetics — to create treatments and vaccines.

More here:
http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/index.php?sty=Y312




Arizona Biotech News


Biotech News

Biotech News - U.S. Sued on Biotech Alfalfa OK

Biotech NEws - U.S. Sued on Biotech Alfalfa OK
>From Reuters

A coalition of farmers, consumers and environmental activists
Thursday sued the U.S. government over its approval of a biotech
alfalfa that critics say will spell havoc for farmers and the
environment.

Opening another front in the battle over genetically modified crops,
the lawsuit contends that the U.S. Department of Agriculture is
improperly allowing Monsanto Co. to sell an herbicide-resistant
alfalfa seed while failing to analyze the public health,
environmental and economic consequences of that action.

http://www.latimes.com/technology/la-fi-alfalfa17feb17,1,1793661.story?coll==la-headlines-technology&ctrack==1&cset==true

"The USDA failed to do a full environmental review when they
deregulated this genetically engineered alfalfa," said Will Rastov,
an attorney for the Center for Food Safety, one of the plaintiffs.



Arizona Biotech News


Biotech News

Arizona Biotech News - Southwest 2006: Transforming Research Visions

Arizona Biotech News - Southwest 2006: Transforming Visions into
Business Realities Comprehensive Bioindustry and Business Conference
in Tucson April 3 & 4

The third of a bi-annual series of conferences organized by the Bio-
Industry Organization of Southern Arizona (BIO-SA), will be held at
the DoubleTree Hotel in Tucson, Arizona on April 3 and 4.

BIO-SA announced that BioSouthwest 2006: Transforming Research
Visions into Business Realities Comprehensive Bioindustry and
Business Conference will be held in Tucson April 3 & 4

http://www.arizonabiotech.com/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biotech-news/

BioSouthwest 2006, third of a bi-annual series of conferences
organized by the Bio-Industry Organization of Southern Arizona (BIO-
SA), will be held at the DoubleTree Hotel in Tucson, Arizona on
April 3 and 4.

This year's program is expected to better nurture the convergence of
science and business.

Business-track sessions are designed to provide young and maturing
bioscience companies with exposure to resources to help maximize
growth. Scientific sessions will offer current and future research
topics of the 21st century.

The program is available at www.bio-sa.org

Venture Capitalist G. Steven Burrill of Burrill & Company in San
Francisco will give the opening keynote.

The midday Plenary Address by Dr. Vicki Chandler, Director of the
BIO5 Institute, will provide a vision of multidisciplinary
biological research yielding tangible benefits. A goal of BIO5
(http://bio5.org/) is to link researchers and the private sector to
deliver benefits to the community. She is a distinguished Regents'
Professor and member of the National Academy of Sciences, a winner
of the NIH Director's Pioneer award and celebrated investigator of
the genetics of maize.

Dr. David Thorpe, BIO-SA Chair & BioSouthwest Project Manager,
said "We are excited about the excellent program and the
unprecedented networking opportunities this event will provide to
members of our local biotech cluster as well as to attendees we will
draw from outside the region. BIO-SA strives to help establish the
connections needed to translate research visions into business
realities for our community. We know that cohesive communities are
critical to vibrant high-tech economies, and our meeting will help
people to make connections between scientific and business
communities. BioSouthwest should help improve human lives by
enabling the transformation of scientific ideas into realities."

ABOUT BIO-SA:

The BioIndustry Organization of Southern Arizona (BIO-SA) is
committed to promoting bioindustry in the region through community
building and business enablement. The BIO-SA cluster works to ensure
that the ingredients required for further expansion of the area's
bioindustry sector are in place. The BIO-SA cluster is comprised of
members from large and small companies, higher education and
research institutions, and individuals interested in the development
of a strong bioindustry in Southern Arizona. See http://www.bio-
sa.org for additional information.

BioSouthwest 2006 and BIO-SA CONTACT:
David Thorpe, MD PhD
Chair, BIOSA
Dept. of Discovery Biology
Sanofi-Aventis Combinatorial Technologies Center
Telephone: (520) 544 - 5842
FAX: (520) 575 - 8283




Arizona Biotech News


Biotech News

Arizona Biotech News - ASU teams up with Mayo Clinic to fight cancer

Arizona Biotech News - ASU teams up with Mayo Clinic to fight cancer
By Emily Gersema, Tribune
February 17, 2006

A leading Scottsdale hospital and university researchers are
combining their brain power to fight cancer.

The Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University are forming a
partnership called "MAC-5," which combines the expertise of
scientists from both entities to make research discoveries and
improve cancer treatment, university officials announced Thursday.

Several ASU researchers from various fields, including engineering
and computer science, are taking part in the relationship. They will
work closely with Mayo Clinic physicians in Scottsdale to develop
ther- apies for patients and further study the disease in its
various forms.

George Poste leads ASU's Biodesign Institute, whose researchers are
involved in the partnership. Poste said he believes their efforts
could lead to health care tailored to each patient's unique needs —
a new level of care achieved with help from the institute's biotech
research. This is a growing area of study that applies discoveries
by scientists in various fields — from plant sciences to human
genetics — to create treatments and vaccines.

More here:
http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/index.php?sty=Y312



Arizona Biotech News


Biotech News

Biotech News - Biotech Gold

Biotech News - Biotech Gold


by: Dean Kleckner, Chairman, Truth About Trade & Technology


Dean Kleckner

If the Winter Olympics were to award medals for anti-biotech
hysteria, the Europeans probably would sweep the gold, silver, and
bronze. And they wouldn't even need help from the French judge.

http://www.truthabouttrade.org/article.asp?id=R54

But this event features fool's gold--and perhaps finally the time
has come to watch it go the way of tug-of-war (which was eliminated
as an Olympic sport after 1920). That's because a momentous ruling
from the World Trade Organization may help make it obsolete.
According to press reports, a WTO dispute panel has determined that
the European Union was wrong to impose a moratorium on GM foods for
six years.



Arizona Biotech News


Biotech News

Arizona Biotech News - Non-profit aids bioscience

Arizona Biotech News - Non-profit aids bioscience
Bolstering research, attracting firms are goals

Kerry Fehr-Snyder
The Arizona Republic
Feb. 17, 2006 12:00 AM

Business leaders this week formed a non-profit corporation to boost
Arizona's bioscience industry and are trying to recruit an
internationally known leader to head the organization.

Science Foundation Arizona is being created to attract private and
public funding for biotech and biosciences, distribute the funds to
key research efforts and lure new companies.

Its precise projects have yet to be decided, but they could range
from recruiting a pharmaceutical operation to funding expansion of
the Translational Genomics Research Institute or the University of
Arizona College of Medicine in downtown Phoenix, one official said.
advertisement

"We're in the final stages of examining what it would take to stand
on the shoulders of what exists now and be among the best in the
world," said Don Budinger, one of Science Foundation Arizona's
organizers and director of the Rodel Charitable Foundation of
Arizona.

The group's overall mission is "to build and strengthen medical,
scientific and engineering research programs and infrastructure in
the areas of greatest strategic value to Arizona's competitiveness
in the global bioscience economy," Budinger said. He helped lure
computer wafermaker Sumitomo, now called Sitix, to Phoenix in the
1990s.

Budinger was one of four men who filed papers with the state on
Wednesday to incorporate the science foundation as a 501c(3) non-
profit. The others were John Murphy of the Flinn Foundation, Tom
Browning of Greater Phoenix Leadership and Steven W. Lynn of Uni-
source Energy, parent company of Tucson Electric Power.

Science Foundation Arizona is modeled in part after Science
Foundation Ireland. The Ireland group is led by William Harris,
former director of the Biosphere 2 Center in Oracle, near Tucson.

Harris is reportedly Arizona's top choice to lead Science Foundation
Arizona, although he apparently is weighing several offers despite
the state's efforts to court him since early December. He is a
consultant for Arizona's bioscience efforts. His contract with
Science Foundation Ireland is set to expire at the end of March.

"Bill Harris is the man who led the effort to reform Ireland's
economy and would be a great asset to Arizona," Gov. Janet
Napolitano said through a spokeswoman.

More here:
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/business/articles/0217scifoundation.html

http://www.arizonabiotech.com/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biotech-news/

http://www.arizonabiotech.com/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biotech-news/
http://www.arizonaentrepreneurs.com/
http://www.azhttp.com/

Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biotech-news/

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
biotech-news-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

Biotech News - U.S. Sued on Biotech Alfalfa OK

Biotech NEws - U.S. Sued on Biotech Alfalfa OK
From Reuters

A coalition of farmers, consumers and environmental activists
Thursday sued the U.S. government over its approval of a biotech
alfalfa that critics say will spell havoc for farmers and the
environment.

Opening another front in the battle over genetically modified crops,
the lawsuit contends that the U.S. Department of Agriculture is
improperly allowing Monsanto Co. to sell an herbicide-resistant
alfalfa seed while failing to analyze the public health,
environmental and economic consequences of that action.

http://www.latimes.com/technology/la-fi-alfalfa17feb17,1,1793661.story?coll==la-headlines-technology&ctrack==1&cset==true

"The USDA failed to do a full environmental review when they
deregulated this genetically engineered alfalfa," said Will Rastov,
an attorney for the Center for Food Safety, one of the plaintiffs.

http://www.arizonabiotech.com/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biotech-news/

http://www.arizonabiotech.com/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biotech-news/
http://www.arizonaentrepreneurs.com/
http://www.azhttp.com/

Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biotech-news/

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
biotech-news-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

Arizona Biotech News - Gordon notes biotech progress

( Phoenix Mayor Phil Gordon State of the City Speech Notes Biotech
Progress )

State of the City: Gordon notes biotech progress, stumps for bonds
Chris Casacchia
The Business Journal

The University of Arizona will locate its Clinical Pharmacogenomics
Institute in downtown Phoenix next year, Mayor Phil Gordon said
Tuesday during his 2006 State of the City address at the Hyatt
Regency.

The Phoenix biomedical campus will house more than 50
pharmaceutical "scientists-in-training," who will work with
researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute, the
Mayor said.

Pharmacogenomics is the study of how a person's genetic inheritance
affects the body's response to drugs.

http://phoenix.bizjournals.com/phoenix/stories/2006/02/13/daily24.htm
l?jst==b_ln_hl

http://www.arizonabiotech.com/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biotech-news/

http://www.arizonabiotech.com/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biotech-news/
http://www.arizonaentrepreneurs.com/
http://www.azhttp.com/

Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biotech-news/

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
biotech-news-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

Thursday, February 16, 2006

Celera Genomics Announces That Abbott Has Selected Two Additional Cancer Targets



http://www.arizonabiotech.com/

Celera Genomics Announces That Abbott Has Selected Two Additional Cancer Targets for Further Development; Seven Celera Genomics Antigens Now in Research Pipeline with Partners

 

Feb 15, 2006 - Celera Genomics Group (NYSE:CRA), an Applera Corporation business, today announced that Abbott (NYSE:ABT) has selected two Celera antigen targets for further investigation and potential therapeutic development. These are in addition to the two targets Abbott selected for advancement in April 2005 and the two targets announced earlier this month. Abbott now has a total of six targets under investigation from the strategic collaboration established between Celera Genomics and Abbott to discover, develop and commercialize therapies for the treatment of cancer.

"We're delighted that Abbott has selected another two antigens for further investigation," said Kathy Ordonez, President of Celera Genomics. "We have performed outstanding work on our proteomics platform over the past few years, and we've made good progress towards discovering and validating targets in pancreatic, lung, colon, breast, gastric, prostate and renal cancers. The selection of four of these targets by Abbott in the last month further demonstrates the value of this platform for our current and potential partners. Now that we have a total of seven antigens in the research pipeline with partners, we look forward to moving additional targets forward for therapeutic development through current and future collaborations."

Under the terms of the collaboration agreement, a number of protein antigens identified and validated by Celera Genomics are being screened by Abbott. The collaboration encompasses the development of therapeutic antibodies and small molecule drugs against over-expressed cell-surface proteins that have been associated with cancer and identified as therapeutic targets through proteomics research at Celera Genomics. Any of these antigens may be selected for therapeutic development at Abbott. Once this development is complete, Celera Genomics may elect to jointly fund clinical development and commercialization of any resulting therapeutic products and would share any financial returns resulting from commercialization, or alternately be paid milestones and royalties on successful therapies. Abbott has responsibility for the commercialization of jointly funded collaboration products. Celera Genomics retains certain diagnostic rights associated with selected targets.

About Celera Genomics and Applera Corporation

Applera Corporation consists of two operating groups. The Celera Genomics Group is focused on discovery, development, and commercialization of diagnostic products as well as leveraging its proteomic, bioinformatic, and genomic capabilities to identify and validate drug targets and pharmacogenomic markers. It seeks to advance its therapeutic discoveries through partnerships with technology and market leaders. The Applied Biosystems Group serves the life science industry and research community by developing and marketing instrument-based systems, consumables, software, and services. Customers use these tools to analyze nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), small molecules, and proteins to make scientific discoveries and develop new pharmaceuticals. Applied Biosystems' products also serve the needs of some markets outside of life science research, which we refer to as "applied markets," such as the fields of: human identity testing (forensic and paternity testing); biosecurity, which refers to products needed in response to the threat of biological terrorism and other malicious, accidental, and natural biological dangers; and quality and safety testing, for example in food and the environment. Applied Biosystems is headquartered in Foster City, CA, and reported sales of nearly $1.8 billion during fiscal 2005. Information about Applera Corporation, including reports and other information filed by the company with the Securities and Exchange Commission, is available at http://www.applera.com, or by telephoning 800.762.6923. Information about Celera Genomics is available at http://www.celera.com.

Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements in this press release are forward-looking. These may be identified by the use of forward-looking words or phrases such as "believe," "expect," "intend," "should," and "planned," among others. These forward-looking statements are based on Applera Corporation's current expectations. The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 provides a "safe harbor" for such forward-looking statements. In order to comply with the terms of the safe harbor, Applera Corporation notes that a variety of factors could cause actual results and experience to differ materially from the anticipated results or other expectations expressed in such forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties include but are not limited to: (1) Celera Genomics' unproven ability to discover, develop, or commercialize proprietary therapeutic or diagnostic products; and (2) other factors that might be described from time to time in Applera Corporation's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. All information in this press release is as of the date of the release, and Applera does not undertake any duty to update this information, including any forward-looking statements, unless required by law.

 

http://www.arizonabiotech.com/

 

European Regulatory Committee Recommends Orphan Drug Status

European Regulatory Committee Recommends Orphan Drug Status for GPC
Biotech's Anticancer Monoclonal Antibody 1D09C3 for Multiple Myeloma

GPC Biotech AG

(Press Release)

Martinsried/Munich (Germany), Waltham, Mass. and Princeton, N.J.,
February 14, 2006 – GPC Biotech AG (Frankfurt Stock Exchange: GPC;
TecDAX index; NASDAQ: GPCB) today announced that the Committee for
Orphan Medicinal Products (COMP) of the European Medicines Agency
(EMEA) has recommended the granting of orphan medicinal product
designation for the anticancer monoclonal antibody 1D09C3 for the
treatment of multiple myeloma. The orphan drug status becomes
effective when the European Commission has approved this
recommendation. 1D09C3 is currently in a Phase 1 clinical program
that is evaluating the antibody in patients with relapsed or
refractory B-cell lymphomas, including Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's
lymphomas, who have failed prior standard therapy.

The orphan drug program of the EMEA is designed to promote the
development of drugs to treat life-threatening or very serious
conditions that affect no more than five in every 10,000 people in
the European Union (EU). The designation provides EU market
exclusivity for up to ten years in the given indication. Other
potential benefits include: a reduction in fees associated with
various aspects of the regulatory process, including the application
for marketing approval, and EMEA guidance in preparing a dossier for
marketing approval. 1D09C3 was previously granted orphan medicinal
product designation by the European Commission for Hodgkin's
lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, a type of non-Hodgkin's
lymphoma.

About 1D09C3

1D09C3 is an anti-MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class II
monoclonal antibody. 1D09C3 binds to MHC class II molecules on the
cell surface and in preclinical studies appears to selectively kill
activated, proliferating tumor cells, which include B-cell and T-
cell lymphomas. In 2004, it was estimated that more than 54,000
people in the U.S. and about 64,000 people in the EU were newly
diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the most common form of
lymphoma. Multiple myeloma is an aggressive type of non-Hodgkin's
lymphoma and currently affects approximately 67,000 people in the
EU. In preclinical studies, 1D09C3 has been shown to induce
programmed cell death and does not require a functioning immune
system for its cell-killing effect. A Phase 1 clinical program
evaluating 1D09C3 in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell
lymphomas who have failed prior standard therapy, is currently
underway at several major cancer centers in Europe. 1D09C3 has been
granted orphan medicinal product designation for the treatment of
Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Additional
information on 1D09C3 can be found in the Anticancer Programs
section of the Company's Web site at www.gpc-biotech.com.

GPC Biotech AG is a biopharmaceutical company discovering and
developing new anticancer drugs. The Company's lead product
candidate – satraplatin – has achieved target enrollment in a Phase
3 registrational trial as a second-line chemotherapy treatment in
hormone-refractory prostate cancer. The U.S. FDA has granted fast
track designation to satraplatin for this indication, and GPC
Biotech has begun the rolling NDA submission process for this
compound. GPC biotech is also developing a monoclonal antibody with
a novel mechanism-of-action against a variety of lymphoid tumors,
currently in Phase 1 clinical development, and has ongoing drug
development and discovery programs that leverage its expertise in
kinase inhibitors. GPC Biotech AG is headquartered in
Martinsried/Munich (Germany). The Company's wholly owned U.S.
subsidiary has sites in Waltham, Massachusetts and Princeton, New
Jersey. For additional information, please visit the Company's Web
site at www.gpc-biotech.com.

***

This press release may contain projections or estimates about plans
and objectives relating to our future operations, products, or
services; future financial results; or assumptions underlying or
relating to any such statements. These statements are forward-
looking and are subject to risks and uncertainties, many of which
are beyond our control. Actual results could differ materially
depending on a number of factors, including the timing and effects
of regulatory actions, the results of clinical trials, the Company's
relative success developing and gaining market acceptance for any
new products, and the effectiveness of patent protection. There can
be no guarantee that the Phase 1 trials with 1D09C3 will be
successfully completed nor that 1D09C3 will be approved for
marketing in a timely manner, if at all. We direct you to the
Company's Annual Report on Form 20-F, as amended, for the fiscal
year ended December 31, 2004 and other reports filed with the U.S.
Securities and Exchange Commission for additional details on the
important factors that may affect the Company's future results,
performance and achievements. The Company disclaims any intent or
obligation to update these forward-looking statements or the factors
that may affect the Company's future results, performance or
achievements, even if new information becomes available in the
future.

What Makes Biotech Tick? Needs, Trends Spawn Speech

What Makes Biotech Tick? Needs, Trends Spawn Speech
Feb 16, 10:08 AM


By Stephen Pounds, The Palm Beach Post, Fla.



Feb. 16--Robert Lynch grudgingly joined all the other science misfits Wednesday for a four-hour brush-up on high school biology.

"It's a lot to absorb," admitted Lynch, who produces commercial videos for RML Video Production Services in Palm Beach Gardens. "I hope there isn't a test at the end of this."

Lynch was one of more than 80 people Wednesday to attend a biotechnology boot camp at the Palm Beach Community College campus in Palm Beach Gardens. After the previous day's vote by the Palm Beach County Commission to build Scripps Florida in the Abacoa development in Jupiter, business and government types were eager to learn more about the high-octane science being performed in the biotech world.

Biotech News